PLYMOUTH COUNTY, MASSACHUSETTS SOIL SURVEY UPDATE

278A Carver Merrimac complex, nearly level

This map unit complex consists of areas of Carver and Merrimac soils that occur in such intricate patterns on the landform that separation of the two soils was not possible at the scale of mapping. Both soils formed in sandy glacial outwash, Carver soils are excessively drained and typically are found on knobs and ridges. Merrimac soils are well to somewhat excessively drained and typically are found on concave slopes and level areas. The composition of the map unit consists of approximately 50 percent Carver soils, 35 percent Merrimac soils and 15 percent other similar soils. Slopes range from 0 to 5 percent.

Included with this map unit are areas of Plymouth, Hinckley and Haven soils on similar landscapes, and Deerfield soils on lower elevations. Stones and boulders are found in some areas, particularly near end moraines.

Carver soils typically have a dark grey or black loamy coarse sand surface layer 7 inches thick. The subsoil from 7 to 25 inches are strong brown and yellowish-brown loamy coarse sand. From 25 to 29 inches, the subsoil is brownish-yellow coarse sand. The substratum from 29 to 60 inches is light yellowish-brown coarse sand

Carver Soil properties:
Permeability: very rapid throughout.
Available water capacity: low.
Soil reaction: extremely acid to moderately acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: greater than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: greater than six feet.
Type & Months: N/A
Hydrologic group: A.
Hydric Soil: No
Capability Subclass:IVs
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Merrimac soils typically have a very dark grayish-brown fine sandy loam surface layer 10 inches thick. The subsoil layers from 10 to 26 inches are brown fine sandy loam, dark yellowish-brown sandy loam, and dark yellowish-brown gravelly loamy sand. The substratum from 26 to 60 inches is dark grayish-brown stratified sand and gravel.

Merrimac Soil Properties:
Permeability: moderately rapid or rapid in the solum and rapid or very rapid in the substratum.
Available water capacity: low.
Soil reaction: extremely acid through moderately acid.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: more than 6 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: N/A
Hydrologic group: A
Hydric soil: no
Capability subclass: IIs
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Most areas of this map unit are in White Pine, Pitch Pine, and Scrub Oak vegetation. Many areas are used for residential house lots.

Suitability:

Crops:

Areas of Merrimac soils are well suited for most agricultural uses. The areas of Carver soils are poorly suited for agricultural uses mainly due to droughtiness. Mixing plant residue and manure into the surface layer helps to increase the water holding capacity of the soil. This practice also helps to maintain good soil tilth and increases the organic matter content.

Woodland:

Areas of Merrimac soils are well suited for Woodland productivity. Areas of Carver soils are poorly suited for woodland productivity because of droughtiness. Thinning crowded stands to accepted standard stocking levels will provide for more vigorous growth. Diseased, poorly formed and otherwise undesirable trees should receive priority for removal in thinning operations. Trees most common to areas of this soil are pitch pine, scrub oak, scarlet oak, white oak, and black oak. They are generally of poor timber quality and seldom attain heights greater than 35 feet.

Development:

This map unit complex has few limitations for building sites with or without basements. The droughty nature of Carver soils is a limitation for lawns, shallow rooted trees and shrubs. Adding a layer of topsoil and frequent watering during dry periods will help to overcome this limitation. These soils readily absorb but may not adequately filter effluent from septic tank absorption fields, which may result in the pollution of groundwater supplies. Low density housing reduces the volume of effluent entering the groundwater system and will lessen the severity of the pollution hazard. Additional precautionary measures may be necessary in some areas.

278B Carver Merrimac complex, undulating

This map unit complex consists of areas of Carver and Merrimac soils that occur in such intricate patterns on the landform that separation of the two soils was not possible at the scale of mapping. Both soils formed in sandy glacial outwash, Carver soils are excessively drained and typically are found on knobs and ridges. Merrimac soils are well to somewhat excessively drained and typically are found on concave slopes and level areas. The composition of the map unit consists of approximately 50 percent Carver soils, 35 percent Merrimac soils and 15 percent other similar soils. Slopes range from 5 to 10 percent.

Included with this map unit are areas of Plymouth, Hinckley and Haven soils on similar landscapes, and Deerfield soils on lower elevations. Stones and boulders are found in some areas, particularly near end moraines.

Carver soils typically have a dark grey or black loamy coarse sand surface layer 7 inches thick. The subsoil from 7 to 25 inches are strong brown and yellowish-brown loamy coarse sand. From 25 to 29 inches, the subsoil is brownish-yellow coarse sand. The substratum from 29 to 60 inches is light yellowish-brown coarse sand

Carver Soil properties:

Permeability: very rapid throughout.

Available water capacity: low.

Soil reaction: extremely acid to moderately acid throughout.

Depth to bedrock: greater than 60 inches.

Seasonal high water table: Depth: greater than six feet.

Type & Months: N/A

Hydrologic group: A.

Hydric Soil: No

Capability Subclass:IVs

Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.

Duration & Months: none.

Merrimac soils typically have a very dark grayish-brown fine sandy loam surface layer 10 inches thick. The subsoil layers from 10 to 26 inches are brown fine sandy loam, dark yellowish-brown sandy loam, and dark yellowish-brown gravelly loamy sand. The substratum from 26 to 60 inches is dark grayish-brown stratified sand and gravel.

Merrimac Soil Properties:

Permeability: moderately rapid or rapid in the solum and rapid or very rapid in the substratum.

Available water capacity: low.

Soil reaction: extremely acid through moderately acid.

Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.

Seasonal high water table: Depth: more than 6 feet below the surface.

Type & Months: N/A

Hydrologic group: A

Hydric soil: no

Capability subclass: IIs

Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.

Duration & Months: none.

Most areas of this map unit are in White Pine, Pitch Pine, and Scrub Oak vegetation. Many areas are used for residential house lots.

Suitability:

Crops:

Areas of Merrimac soils are well suited for most agricultural uses. The areas of Carver soils are poorly suited for agricultural uses mainly due to droughtiness. Mixing plant residue and manure into the surface layer helps to increase the water holding capacity of the soil. This practice also helps to maintain good soil tilth and increases the organic matter content.

Woodland:

Areas of Merrimac soils are well suited for Woodland productivity. Areas of Carver soils are poorly suited for woodland productivity because of droughtiness. Thinning crowded stands to accepted standard stocking levels will provide for more vigorous growth. Diseased, poorly formed and otherwise undesirable trees should receive priority for removal in thinning operations. Trees most common to areas of this soil are pitch pine, scrub oak, scarlet oak, white oak, and black oak. They are generally of poor timber quality and seldom attain heights greater than 35 feet.

Development:

This map unit complex has few limitations for building sites with or without basements. The droughty nature of Carver soils is a limitation for lawns, shallow rooted trees and shrubs. Adding a layer of topsoil and frequent watering during dry periods will help to overcome this limitation. These soils readily absorb but may not adequately filter effluent from septic tank absorption fields, which may result in the pollution of groundwater supplies. Low density housing reduces the volume of effluent entering the groundwater system and will lessen the severity of the pollution hazard. Additional precautionary measures may be necessary in some areas.

278C Carver Merrimac complex, rolling

This map unit complex consists of areas of Carver and Merrimac soils that occur in such intricate patterns on the landform that separation of the two soils was not possible at the scale of mapping. Both soils formed in sandy glacial outwash, Carver soils are excessively drained and typically are found on knobs and ridges. Merrimac soils are well to somewhat excessively drained and typically are found on concave slopes and level areas. The composition of the map unit consists of approximately 50 percent Carver soils, 35 percent Merrimac soils and 15 percent other similar soils. Slopes range from 10 to 20 percent.

Included with this map unit are areas of Plymouth, Hinckley and Haven soils on similar landscapes, and Deerfield soils on lower elevations. Stones and boulders are found in some areas, particularly near end moraines.

Carver soils typically have a dark grey or black loamy coarse sand surface layer 7 inches thick. The subsoil from 7 to 25 inches are strong brown and yellowish-brown loamy coarse sand. From 25 to 29 inches, the subsoil is brownish-yellow coarse sand. The substratum from 29 to 60 inches is light yellowish-brown coarse sand

Carver Soil properties:

Permeability: very rapid throughout.

Available water capacity: low.

Soil reaction: extremely acid to moderately acid throughout.

Depth to bedrock: greater than 60 inches.

Seasonal high water table: Depth: greater than six feet.

Type & Months: N/A

Hydrologic group: A.

Hydric Soil: No

Capability Subclass:IVs

Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.

Duration & Months: none.

Merrimac soils typically have a very dark grayish-brown fine sandy loam surface layer 10 inches thick. The subsoil layers from 10 to 26 inches are brown fine sandy loam, dark yellowish-brown sandy loam, and dark yellowish-brown gravelly loamy sand. The substratum from 26 to 60 inches is dark grayish-brown stratified sand and gravel.

Merrimac Soil Properties:

Permeability: moderately rapid or rapid in the solum and rapid or very rapid in the substratum.

Available water capacity: low.

Soil reaction: extremely acid through moderately acid.

Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.

Seasonal high water table: Depth: more than 6 feet below the surface.

Type & Months: N/A

Hydrologic group: A

Hydric soil: no

Capability subclass: IIs

Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.

Duration & Months: none.

Most areas of this map unit are in White Pine, Pitch Pine, and Scrub Oak vegetation. Many areas are used for residential house lots.

Suitability:

Crops:

The steep slopes may cause an erosion hazard when plowed. Farming on the contour or across slope, terracing, strip-cropping, crop rotations, cover crops, and conservation tillage are practices that help to reduce runoff and control erosion. Mixing plant residue and manure into the surface layer helps to increase the water holding capacity of the soils in this map unit. This practice also helps to maintain good soil tilth and increases the organic matter content.

Woodland:

Areas of Merrimac soils are well suited for Woodland productivity. Areas of Carver soils are poorly suited for woodland productivity because of droughtiness. Thinning crowded stands to accepted standard stocking levels will provide for more vigorous growth. Diseased, poorly formed and otherwise undesirable trees should receive priority for removal in thinning operations. Trees most common to areas of this soil are pitch pine, scrub oak, scarlet oak, white oak, and black oak. They are generally of poor timber quality and seldom attain heights greater than 35 feet.

Development:

Slope is a limitation for building sites and land shaping is generally needed. Buildings and lots should be designed to conform to the natural slope of the land. There is a hazard of erosion during and after construction. Slopes should be protected and planted to well adapted grasses as soon after disturbance as possible to minimize the erosion hazard. This map unit complex has few limitations for building sites with or without basements. The droughty nature of Carver soils is a limitation for lawns, shallow rooted trees and shrubs. Adding a layer of topsoil and frequent watering during dry periods will help to overcome this limitation. These soils readily absorb but may not adequately filter effluent from septic tank absorption fields, which may result in the pollution of groundwater supplies. Low density housing reduces the volume of effluent entering the groundwater system and will lessen the severity of the pollution hazard. Additional precautionary measures may be necessary in some areas.

 

303B Montauk - Barnstable complex, undulating

This map unit consists of undulating, very deep, well drained Montauk and Barnstable soils on moraines, deposits of flow till, and uplands. The soils occur as areas so intricately mixed or so small that separating them in mapping is not practical at the scale of mapping. Slopes range from 0 to 5 percent. These areas are about 45 percent Montauk soils, 30 percent Barnstable soils, and 25 percent other soils.

Montauk soils in a wooded area typically have a dark brown sandy loam surface layer 2 inches thick. The subsoil from 2 to 27 inches is yellowish-brown fine sandy loam. The substratum from 27 to 60 inches is a firm and brittle dark brown sandy loam and reddish-brown loamy sand

Barnstable soils typically have a sandy loam surface layer 2 inches thick. The subsoil, from 2 to 22 inches, is yellowish-brown or light olive brown, friable, sandy loam the substratum from 22 to 65 inches is a loose, light yellowish-brown coarse sand

Included with this map unit complex are areas of Plymouth and Canton soils on similar landscape positions. Birchwood and Scituate soils are on concave slopes. Also included are areas where surface stones and boulders occupy 0.1 to 3 percent of the area.

Montauk Soil Properties
Permeability: moderate to moderately rapid in the solum, slow to moderately slow in the substratum.
Available water capacity: moderate to low.
Soil reaction: extremely acid to moderately acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: 2.5 to 4.0 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: perched, Feb. to May.
Hydrologic group: C.
Hydric soil: no.
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Barnstable Soil Properties:
Permeability: moderately rapid in the solum and rapid to very rapid in the substratum.
Available water capacity: moderate.
Soil reaction: extremely acid through moderately acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: greater than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: greater than six feet.
Type & Months: Apparent, N/A
Hydrologic group: B
Hydric Soil: No
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Most areas of this map unit are in woodland. Some areas are used for residential houses and some are used for agricultural production.

Suitability:

Crops:

This map unit is considered prime farmland. This soil is well suited to cultivated crops and pasture. Farming on the contour, strip-cropping and the use of cover crops, grasses and legumes in the cropping system help to reduce runoff and control erosion. Overgrazing is the main pasture management concern. Rotation grazing and restricted grazing during wet periods will help to maintain vegetative cover and prevent compaction. This soil usually occurs on hills that exhibit good air drainage, providing some frost protection to fruit crops.

Woodland:

This soil is well suited for woodland productivity and there are no major limitations that restrict woodland management. The high productivity of this soil justifies intensive management for either hardwoods or conifers. Plant competition at the time of regeneration is moderate if conifers are grown. To provide for more vigorous growth, crowded stands should be thinned to accepted standard stocking levels, giving priority to diseased, poorly formed or otherwise undesirable trees. Shelterwood cutting, seed tree cutting and clear-cutting can be used to establish natural regeneration or to provide suitable planting sites. Removal or control of competing vegetation may be necessary for optimum growth of newly established seedlings. This soil is erodible, particularly on slopes longer than 150 feet and where vegetative cover is removed or disturbed. Constructing access roads and trails along the contour and minimizing soil disturbance will reduce runoff and prevent excessive erosion.

Development:

The two dominant soils in this map unit vary in the type of geologic parent materials (substratum) underlying the soil surface and subsoil. Montauk soils have a firm to very firm hardpan layer, which impedes downward water movement. Montauk soils are poorly suited for soil absorption systems due to the slowly permeable substratum. In some areas it is possible to locate suitable material below 72 inches of the areas of Montauk soils in this unit. Barnstable soils have a highly permeable substratum and are well suited for most development uses. Erosion hazards during excavation and disturbance of these soils are likely. Stockpiles and disturbed ground should be protected using erosion control practices. Subsurface stones and boulders are usually associated with this glacial till soil and may hinder excavation operations.

This map unit is in capability subclass: IIe

303C Montauk Barnstable complex, rolling

This map unit consists of rolling, very deep, well drained Montauk and Barnstable soils on moraines, deposits of flow till, and uplands. The soils occur as areas so intricately mixed or so small that separating them in mapping is not practical at the scale of mapping. Slopes range from 5 to 15 percent. These areas are about 45 percent Montauk soils, 30 percent Barnstable soils, and 25 percent other soils.

Montauk soils in a wooded area typically have a dark brown sandy loam surface layer 2 inches thick. The subsoil from 2 to 27 inches is yellowish-brown fine sandy loam. The substratum from 27 to 60 inches is a firm and brittle dark brown sandy loam and reddish-brown loamy sand

Barnstable soils typically have a sandy loam surface layer 2 inches thick. The subsoil, from 2 to 22 inches, is yellowish-brown or light olive brown, friable, sandy loam the substratum from 22 to 65 inches is a loose, light yellowish-brown coarse sand

Included with this map unit complex are areas of Plymouth and Canton soils on similar landscape positions. Birchwood and Scituate soils are on concave slopes. Also included are areas where surface stones and boulders occupy 0.1 to 3 percent of the area.

Montauk Soil Properties
Permeability: moderate to moderately rapid in the solum, slow to moderately slow in the substratum.
Available water capacity: moderate to low.
Soil reaction: extremely acid to moderately acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: 2.5 to 4.0 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: perched, Feb. to May.
Hydrologic group: C.
Hydric soil: no.
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Barnstable Soil Properties:
Permeability: moderately rapid in the solum and rapid to very rapid in the substratum.
Available water capacity: moderate.
Soil reaction: extremely acid through moderately acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: greater than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: greater than six feet.
Type & Months: Apparent, N/A
Hydrologic group: B
Hydric Soil: No
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Most areas of this map unit are in woodland. Some areas are used for residential houses and some are used for agricultural production.

Suitability:

Crops:

This soil is suited to cultivated crops. This map unit is highly erodible, particularly on slopes longer than 150 feet or where vegetative cover is removed or disturbed. Farming on the contour, strip-cropping, diversions and the use of cover crops, grasses and legumes in the cropping system help to reduce runoff and control erosion. This soil occurs on hills that exhibit good air drainage, providing some frost protection for fruit crops. It is well suited to improved pasture. Rotation grazing and restricted grazing during wet periods will help to maintain vegetative cover, prevent compaction and reduce erosion.

Woodland:

This soil is well suited for woodland productivity and there are no major limitations that restrict woodland management. The high productivity of this soil justifies intensive management for either hardwoods or conifers. Plant competition at the time of regeneration is moderate if conifers are grown. Thinning crowded stands to accepted standard stocking levels will provide for more vigorous growth. Diseased, poorly formed or otherwise undesirable trees should receive priority in thinning operations. Shelterwood cutting, seed tree cutting and clear-cutting can be used to establish natural regeneration or to provide suitable planting sites. Removal or control of competing vegetation may be necessary for optimum growth of newly established seedlings. Constructing access roads along the contour, installing water bars and minimizing soil disturbance will reduce runoff and prevent excessive erosion.

Development:

The two dominant soils in this map unit vary in the type of geologic parent materials (substratum) underlying the soil surface and subsoil. Montauk soils have a firm to very firm hardpan layer, which impedes downward water movement. Montauk soils are poorly suited for soil absorption systems due to the slowly permeable substratum. In some areas it is possible to locate suitable material below 72 inches of the areas of Montauk soils in this unit. Barnstable soils have a highly permeable substratum and are well suited for most development uses. Erosion hazards during excavation and disturbance of these soils are likely. Stockpiles and disturbed ground should be protected using erosion control practices. Planting exposed areas with well adapted grasses and mulching during construction will reduce runoff and erosion on this highly erodible map unit. Subsurface stones and boulders are usually associated with this glacial till soil and may hinder excavation operations.

This map unit is in capability subclass: IIIe

304 B Montauk Barnstable complex, undulating, bouldery.

This map unit consists of undulating, very deep, well drained Montauk and Barnstable soils on moraines, deposits of flow till, and uplands. The soils occur as areas so intricately mixed or so small that separating them in mapping is not practical at the scale of mapping. Slopes range from 0 to 5 percent. These areas are about 45 percent Montauk soils, 30 percent Barnstable soils, and 25 percent other soils. Surface stones and boulders cover 0.1 to 3 percent of the map unit.

Montauk soils in a wooded area typically have a dark brown sandy loam surface layer 2 inches thick. The subsoil from 2 to 27 inches is yellowish-brown fine sandy loam. The substratum from 27 to 60 inches is a firm and brittle dark brown sandy loam and reddish-brown loamy sand

Barnstable soils typically have a sandy loam surface layer 2 inches thick. The subsoil, from 2 to 22 inches, is yellowish-brown or light olive brown, friable, sandy loam the substratum from 22 to 65 inches is a loose, light yellowish-brown coarse sand

Included with this map unit complex are areas of Plymouth and Canton soils on similar landscape positions. Birchwood and Scituate soils are on concave slopes. Also included are areas where surface stones and boulders occupy less than 0.1 percent of the area.

Montauk Soil Properties
Permeability: moderate to moderately rapid in the solum, slow to moderately slow in the substratum.
Available water capacity: moderate to low.
Soil reaction: extremely acid to moderately acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: 2.5 to 4.0 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: perched, Feb. to May.
Hydrologic group: C.
Hydric soil: no.
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Barnstable Soil Properties:
Permeability: moderately rapid in the solum and rapid to very rapid in the substratum.
Available water capacity: moderate.
Soil reaction: extremely acid through moderately acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: greater than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: greater than six feet.
Type & Months: Apparent, N/A
Hydrologic group: B
Hydric Soil: No
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Most areas of this map unit are in woodland. Some areas are used for residential houses and some are used for agricultural production.

Suitability:

Crops:

Surface stones and boulders may interfere with plowing these soils. Farming on the contour, strip-cropping and the use of cover crops, grasses and legumes in the cropping system help to reduce runoff and control erosion. Overgrazing is the main pasture management concern. Rotation grazing and restricted grazing during wet periods will help to maintain vegetative cover and prevent compaction. This soil usually occurs on hills that exhibit good air drainage, providing some frost protection to fruit crops. This map unit is well suited for pasture.

Woodland:

This soil is well suited for woodland productivity and there are no major limitations that restrict woodland management. The high productivity of this soil justifies intensive management for either hardwoods or conifers. Plant competition at the time of regeneration is moderate if conifers are grown. To provide for more vigorous growth, crowded stands should be thinned to accepted standard stocking levels, giving priority to diseased, poorly formed or otherwise undesirable trees. Shelterwood cutting, seed tree cutting and clear-cutting can be used to establish natural regeneration or to provide suitable planting sites. Removal or control of competing vegetation may be necessary for optimum growth of newly established seedlings. This soil is erodible, particularly on slopes longer than 150 feet and where vegetative cover is removed or disturbed. Constructing access roads and trails along the contour and minimizing soil disturbance will reduce runoff and prevent excessive erosion.

Development:

The two dominant soils in this map unit vary in the type of geologic parent materials (substratum) underlying the soil surface and subsoil. Montauk soils have a firm to very firm hardpan layer, which impedes downward water movement. Montauk soils are poorly suited for soil absorption systems due to the slowly permeable substratum. In some areas it is possible to locate suitable material below 72 inches of the areas of Montauk soils in this unit. Barnstable soils have a highly permeable substratum and are well suited for most development uses. Erosion hazards during excavation and disturbance of these soils are likely. Stockpiles and disturbed ground should be protected using erosion control practices. Surface and subsurface stones and boulders are usually associated with this glacial till soil and may hinder excavation operations.

This map unit is in capability subclass: IIs

304C Montauk Barnstable complex, rolling, bouldery

This map unit consists of rolling, very deep, well drained Montauk and Barnstable soils on moraines, deposits of flow till, and uplands. The soils occur as areas so intricately mixed or so small that separating them in mapping is not practical at the scale of mapping. Slopes range from 5 to 15 percent. These areas are about 45 percent Montauk soils, 30 percent Barnstable soils, and 25 percent other soils. Surface stones and boulders occupy 0.1 to 3 percent of the map unit.

Montauk soils in a wooded area typically have a dark brown sandy loam surface layer 2 inches thick. The subsoil from 2 to 27 inches is yellowish-brown fine sandy loam. The substratum from 27 to 60 inches is a firm and brittle dark brown sandy loam and reddish-brown loamy sand

Barnstable soils typically have a sandy loam surface layer 2 inches thick. The subsoil, from 2 to 22 inches, is yellowish-brown or light olive brown, friable, sandy loam the substratum from 22 to 65 inches is a loose, light yellowish-brown coarse sand

Included with this map unit complex are areas of Plymouth and Canton soils on similar landscape positions. Birchwood and Scituate soils are on concave slopes. Also included are areas where surface stones and boulders occupy less than 0.1 percent of the area.

Montauk Soil Properties
Permeability: moderate to moderately rapid in the solum, slow to moderately slow in the substratum.
Available water capacity: moderate to low.
Soil reaction: extremely acid to moderately acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: 2.5 to 4.0 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: perched, Feb. to May.
Hydrologic group: C.
Hydric soil: no.
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Barnstable Soil Properties:
Permeability: moderately rapid in the solum and rapid to very rapid in the substratum.
Available water capacity: moderate.
Soil reaction: extremely acid through moderately acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: greater than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: greater than six feet.
Type & Months: Apparent, N/A
Hydrologic group: B
Hydric Soil: No
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Most areas of this map unit are in woodland. Some areas are used for residential houses and some are used for agricultural production.

Suitability:

Crops:

Surface stones and boulders may interfere with plowing activities. This map unit is highly erodible, particularly on slopes longer than 150 feet or where vegetative cover is removed or disturbed. Farming on the contour, strip-cropping, diversions and the use of cover crops, grasses and legumes in the cropping system help to reduce runoff and control erosion. This soil occurs on hills that exhibit good air drainage, providing some frost protection for fruit crops. It is well suited to improved pasture. Rotation grazing and restricted grazing during wet periods will help to maintain vegetative cover, prevent compaction and reduce erosion.

Woodland:

This soil is well suited for woodland productivity and there are no major limitations that restrict woodland management. The high productivity of this soil justifies intensive management for either hardwoods or conifers. Plant competition at the time of regeneration is moderate if conifers are grown. Thinning crowded stands to accepted standard stocking levels will provide for more vigorous growth. Diseased, poorly formed or otherwise undesirable trees should receive priority in thinning operations. Shelterwood cutting, seed tree cutting and clear-cutting can be used to establish natural regeneration or to provide suitable planting sites. Removal or control of competing vegetation may be necessary for optimum growth of newly established seedlings. Constructing access roads along the contour, installing water bars and minimizing soil disturbance will reduce runoff and prevent excessive erosion.

Development:

The two dominant soils in this map unit vary in the type of geologic parent materials (substratum) underlying the soil surface and subsoil. Montauk soils have a firm to very firm hardpan layer, which impedes downward water movement. Montauk soils are poorly suited for soil absorption systems due to the slowly permeable substratum. In some areas it is possible to locate suitable material below 72 inches of the areas of Montauk soils in this unit. Barnstable soils have a highly permeable substratum and are well suited for most development uses. Erosion hazards during excavation and disturbance of these soils are likely. Stockpiles and disturbed ground should be protected using erosion control practices. Planting exposed areas with well adapted grasses and mulching during construction will reduce runoff and erosion on this highly erodible map unit. Surface and subsurface stones and boulders are usually associated with this glacial till soil and may hinder excavation operations.

This map unit is in capability subclass: IIIe

478C - Plymouth-Poquonock comp, rolling, bouldery.

This map unit consists of undulating, very deep, excessively drained Plymouth and Poquonock soils on moraines, deposits of flow till, and uplands. The soils occur as areas so intricately mixed or so small that separating them in mapping is not practical at the scale of mapping. Slopes range from 5 to 15 percent. These areas are about 45 percent Plymouth soils, 30 percent Poquonock soils, and 25 percent other soils. Surface stones and boulders cover 0.1 to 3 percent of the map unit.

Plymouth soils typically have a very dark grayish brown loamy sand surface layer4 inches thick. The subsoil layers from 4 to 27 inches are yellowish brown and brown loamy sand. The substratum from 27 to 65 inches is yellowish-brown loose, gravelly coarse sand.

Poquonock soils typically have a dark brown loamy fine sand surface layer 8 inches thick. The subsoil from 8 to 28 inches is dark yellowish brown loamy fine sand and light olive brown loamy sand. The substratum from 28 to 60 inches is dark gray, very firm and brittle gravelly loam.

Included with this map unit complex are areas of Montauk, Barstable, and Canton soils on similar landscape positions. Birchwood and Scituate soils are on concave slopes. Also included are areas where surface stones and boulders occupy less than 0.1 percent of the area.

Plymouth Soil Properties:
Permeability: rapid in the solum and very rapid in the substratum.
Available water capacity: low
Soil reaction: extremely acid to strongly acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: more than 6 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: N/A
Hydrologic group: A.
Hydric Soil: no.
Capability Subclass: VIs.
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Poquonock Soil Properties:
Permeability: Moderately rapid to rapid in the solum, slow to very slow in the substratum.
Available water holding capacity: Low.
Soil reaction: Very strongly acid to medium acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: Greater than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: 2.5 to 4.0 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: Perched, Nov. to Apr.
Hydrologic group: C.
Hydric Soil: No.
Capability Subclass: IIs
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Most areas of this map unit are in woodland. Some areas are used for residential houses and some are used for agricultural production.

Suitability:

Crops:

Droughtiness is a major limitation of these soils for agricultural uses. Surface stones and boulders may interfere with plowing these soils. Farming on the contour, strip-cropping and the use of cover crops, grasses and legumes in the cropping system help to reduce runoff and control erosion. Overgrazing is the main pasture management concern. Rotation grazing and restricted grazing during wet periods will help to maintain vegetative cover and prevent compaction. This soil usually occurs on hills that exhibit good air drainage, providing some frost protection to fruit crops. This map unit is well suited for pasture.

Woodland:

This map unit is poorly suited to woodland. The use of equipment is restricted because of surface stones and boulders. Thinning dense stands to standard stocking levels will result in more vigorous tree growth. The most common trees are pitch pine, white oak, scarlet oak, eastern white pine, and black oak.

Development:

The two dominant soils in this map unit vary in the type of geologic parent materials (substratum) underlying the soil surface and subsoil. Plymouth soils have a highly permeable substratum and are well suited for most development uses. Poquonock soils have a firm to very firm hardpan layer, which impedes downward water movement. Poquonock soils are poorly suited for soil absorption systems due to the slowly permeable substratum. In some areas it is possible to locate suitable material below 72 inches of the areas of Plymouth soils in this unit. Erosion hazards during excavation and disturbance of these soils are likely. Stockpiles and disturbed ground should be protected using erosion control practices. Surface and subsurface stones and boulders are usually associated with this glacial till soil and may hinder excavation operations.

This map unit is in capability subclass: IIIs

478D - Plymouth-Poquonock comp, hilly, bouldery

This map unit consists of hilly and very hilly, very deep, very deep, excessively drained Plymouth and Poquonock soils on moraines, deposits of flow till, and uplands. The soils occur as areas so intricately mixed or so small that separating them in mapping is not practical at the scale of mapping. Slopes range from 5 to 15 percent. These areas are about 45 percent Plymouth soils, 30 percent Poquonock soils, and 25 percent other soils. Surface stones and boulders cover 0.1 to 3 percent of the map unit.

Plymouth soils typically have a very dark grayish brown loamy sand surface layer4 inches thick. The subsoil layers from 4 to 27 inches are yellowish brown and brown loamy sand. The substratum from 27 to 65 inches is yellowish-brown loose, gravelly coarse sand.

Poquonock soils typically have a dark brown loamy fine sand surface layer 8 inches thick. The subsoil from 8 to 28 inches is dark yellowish brown loamy fine sand and light olive brown loamy sand. The substratum from 28 to 60 inches is dark gray, very firm and brittle gravelly loam.

Included with this map unit complex are areas of Montauk, Barstable, and Canton soils on similar landscape positions. Birchwood and Scituate soils are on concave slopes. Also included are areas where surface stones and boulders occupy less than 0.1 percent of the area.

Plymouth Soil Properties:
Permeability: rapid in the solum and very rapid in the substratum.
Available water capacity: low
Soil reaction: extremely acid to strongly acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: more than 6 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: N/A
Hydrologic group: A.
Hydric Soil: no.
Capability Subclass: VIe.
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Poquonock Soil Properties:
Permeability: Moderately rapid to rapid in the solum, slow to very slow in the substratum.
Available water holding capacity: Low.
Soil reaction: Very strongly acid to medium acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: Greater than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: 2.5 to 4.0 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: Perched, Nov. to Apr.
Hydrologic group: C.
Hydric Soil: No.
Capability Subclass:VIe
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Most areas of this map unit are in woodland. Some areas are used for residential houses and some are used for agricultural production.

Suitability:

Crops:

This soil is unsuited to cropland due to steep slopes, surface stones, and droughtiness. This soil is suited to native pasture. Equipment limitations due to surface stones and steep slopes, make this soil poorly suited to hay and improved pasture. The main management objective is to prevent overgrazing which reduces the hardiness and density of desirable plants. Proper stocking rates, timely grazing, and restricting use during wet periods helps to maintain plant densities and reduce surface compaction.

Woodland:

This soil is suited for woodland productivity. Droughtiness and steep slopes are limitations that affect woodland management. Removal or control of competing vegetation will help to attain optimum growth of newly established seedlings. Trees most common to areas of this soil include pitch pine, white oak, scarlet oak, eastern white pine, and black oak.

Development:

Slope is a limitation for building sites. Large surface and subsurface stones and boulders may hinder excavation activities and add costs to development. Extensive land shaping is generally needed. Buildings and lots should be designed to conform to the natural slope of the land. There is a severe hazard of erosion during and after construction. Slopes should be protected and planted to well adapted grasses as soon after disturbance as possible to minimize the erosion hazard. The two dominant soils in this map unit vary in the type of geologic parent materials (substratum) underlying the soil surface and subsoil. Plymouth soils have a highly permeable substratum and are well suited for most development uses. Poquonock soils have a firm to very firm hardpan layer, which impedes downward water movement. Poquonock soils are poorly suited for soil absorption systems due to the slowly permeable substratum. In some areas it is possible to locate suitable material below 72 inches of the areas of Plymouth soils in this unit. Erosion hazards during excavation and disturbance of these soils are likely. Stockpiles and disturbed ground should be protected using erosion control practices. Surface and subsurface stones and boulders are usually associated with this glacial till soil and may hinder excavation operations. Additional precautionary measures may be necessary in some areas.

480B - Plymouth-Carver complex, undulating.

These very deep, undulating, excessively well drained soils formed in ice-contact glacial deposits consisting of glacial outwash and ablation till. This complex of Plymouth and Carver soils is mapped in areas of moraines, outwash plains, and outwash heads.

The soils occur as areas so intricately mixed that separating them in mapping is not possible. The major differences between the two soils in this complex are related to the volume and type of coarse fragments found in the surface and subsoil. Plymouth soils have a higher percentage of cobble to stone size rock fragments than the Carver soils which lack the larger coarse fragments.

Included with these soils in mapping are areas of Hinckley, Windsor and Poquonock soils. Deerfield and Birchwood soils are in depressions. Also included are areas with isolated surface stones and boulders.

Soil Properties:

Permeability: rapid in the solum and very rapid in the substratum.
Available water capacity: low
Soil reaction: extremely acid to strongly acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: more than 6 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: N/A
Hydrologic group: A.
Hydric Soil: No.
Capability Subclass: IVs.
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.
 

Most areas are used as woodland. A few areas have been developed for homesites.

Suitability:

Crops:

These soils are poorly suited to cultivated crops, hay and pasture. The low available water capacity of these soils are management concerns. Irrigation is needed for most cultivated crops. Mixing plant residue and manure into the surface layer helps to increase the water holding capacity. Farming on the contour or across the slope, terracing, strip-cropping, crop rotations, cover crops, and conservation tillage are practices that help reduce runoff and control erosion. The main management objective is to prevent overgrazing that reduces the hardiness and density of desirable plants. Proper stocking rates, timely grazing, and restricted use during wet periods will help maintain plant densities and reduce surface compaction.

This map unit consists of soils which developed in deep deposits of coarse sand and gravel. Most areas of these soils are excellent sources of sand for cranberry management. The Plymouth soils may require screening to remove large coarse fragments, large boulders may be encountered in deep excavations.

Woodland:

These soils are suited for woodland productivity. Droughtiness is a limitation that affects woodland management and some seedling loss is expected. Removal or control of competing vegetation will help to attain optimum growth of newly established seedlings. Trees most common to areas of these soils include pitch pine, white oak, scarlet oak, eastern white pine, and black oak.

Development:

These soils are suitable for building sites with or without basements. The droughty nature of these soils is a limitation for lawns, shallow rooted trees and shrubs. Adding a layer of topsoil and frequent watering during dry periods will help to overcome this limitation. These soils readily absorb but may not adequately filter the effluent from septic tank absorption fields. The poor filtering capacity may result in the pollution of groundwater. Low density housing reduces the volume of effluent entering the groundwater system and lessens the severity of the pollution hazard. Additional precautionary measures may be necessary in some areas. Subsurface stones and boulders are associated with the Plymouth soils in this map unit and may hinder excavation operations.

480C - Plymouth-Carver complex, rolling.

These very deep, rolling, excessively well drained soils formed in ice-contact glacial deposits consisting of glacial outwash and ablation till. This complex of Plymouth and Carver soils is mapped in areas of moraines, outwash plains, and outwash heads.

The soils occur as areas so intricately mixed that separating them in mapping is not possible. The major differences between the two soils in this complex are related to the volume and type of coarse fragments found in the surface and subsoil. Plymouth soils have a higher percentage of cobble to stone size rock fragments than the Carver soils which lack the larger coarse fragments.

Included with these soils in mapping are areas of Hinckley, Windsor and Poquonock soils. Deerfield and Birchwood soils are in depressions. Also included are areas with isolated surface stones and boulders.

Soil Properties:

Permeability: rapid in the solum and very rapid in the substratum.
Available water capacity: low
Soil reaction: extremely acid to strongly acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: more than 6 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: N/A
Hydrologic group: A.
Hydric Soil: No.
Capability Subclass: IVs.
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Most areas are used as woodland. A few areas have been developed for homesites.

Suitability:

Crops:

These soils are poorly suited to cultivated crops, hay and pasture. The low available water capacity and its susceptibility to erosion are management concerns. Irrigation is needed for most cultivated crops. Mixing plant residue and manure into the surface layer helps to increase the water holding capacity of the soil. Farming on the contour or across the slope, terracing, stripcropping, crop rotations, cover crops, and conservation tillage are practices that help to reduce runoff and control erosion. The main management objective is to prevent overgrazing that reduces the hardiness and density of desirable plants. Proper stocking rates, timely grazing, and restricted use during wet periods, help maintain plant densities and reduce surface compaction.

This map unit consists of soils which developed in deep deposits of coarse sand and gravel. Most areas of these soils are excellent sources of sand for cranberry management. The Plymouth soils may require screening to remove large coarse fragments, large boulders may be encountered in deep excavations.

Woodland:

These soils are suited for woodland productivity. Droughtiness is a limitation that affects woodland management and some seedling loss is expected. Removal or control of competing vegetation will help to attain optimum growth of newly established seedlings. Trees most common to areas of these soils include pitch pine, white oak, scarlet oak, eastern white pine, and black oak.

Development:

Slope is the main limitation for building sites. Land shaping is generally needed. Building and lots should be designed to conform to the natural slope of the land. There is a hazard of erosion during and after construction. Planting slopes to well adapted grasses as soon after disturbance as possible will help to minimize the erosion hazard. These soils are poorly suited for septic tank absorption fields because of the steepness of slope and because the soil does not adequately filter the effluent. The poor filtering capacity may result in the pollution of groundwater. Low density housing that reduces the volume of effluent entering the ground-water system will lessen the severity of the pollution hazard. Installing distribution lines on the contour, or in areas that were graded during construction of the dwelling, will help to overcome the slope limitation. Additional precautionary measures may be necessary in some areas.

Subsurface stones and boulders are associated with the Plymouth soils in this map unit and may hinder excavation operations.

480D - Plymouth-Carver complex, hilly.

These very deep, hilly and very steep, excessively well drained soils formed in ice-contact glacial deposits consisting of glacial outwash and ablation till. This complex of Plymouth and Carver soils are mapped in areas of moraines, outwash plains, and outwash heads.

The soils occur as areas so intricately mixed that separating them in mapping is not possible. The major difference between the two soils in this complex is related to the volume and type of coarse fragments found in the surface and subsoil. Plymouth soils have a higher percentage of cobble to stone size rock fragments than the Carver soils which lack the larger coarse fragments.

Included with these soils in mapping are areas of Hinckley, Windsor and Poquonock soils. Deerfield and Birchwood soils are in depressions. Also included are areas with isolated surface stones and boulders.

Soil Properties:

Permeability: rapid in the solum and very rapid in the substratum.
Available water capacity: low
Soil reaction: extremely acid to strongly acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: more than 6 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: N/A
Hydrologic group: A.
Hydric Soil: No.
Capability Subclass: IVs.
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Most areas are used as woodland. A few areas have been developed for homesites.

Suitability:

Crops:

These soils are generally unsuited to cultivated crops, hay and pasture because of the low available water capacity, steepness of slope, and severe hazard of erosion.

This map unit consists of soils that developed in deep deposits of coarse sand and gravel. Most areas of these soils are excellent sources of sand for cranberry management. The Plymouth soils may require screening to remove large coarse fragments, large boulders may be encountered in deep excavations.

Woodland:

These soils are suited for woodland productivity. Droughtiness and steepness of slope are limitations that affect woodland management. Use of equipment may be hazardous on steeper slopes. Removal or control of competing vegetation will help to attain optimum growth of newly established seedlings. Trees most common to areas of these soils include pitch pine, white oak, scarlet oak, eastern white pine, and black oak.

Development:

Slope is the main limitation for building sites. Extensive land shaping is generally needed. Buildings and lots should be designed to conform to the natural slope of the land. There is a severe hazard of erosion during and after construction. Planting slopes to well adapted grasses as soon after disturbance as possible will help to minimize the erosion hazard. These soils are poorly suited for septic tank absorption fields because of the steepness of slope and because the soil may not adequately filter the effluent. The poor filtering capacity may result in the pollution of groundwater. Low density housing reduces the volume of effluent entering the groundwater system and lessens the severity of the pollution hazard. Installing distribution lines on the contour, or in areas that were graded during construction of the dwelling, will help to overcome the slope limitation. Additional precautionary measures may be necessary in some cases. Subsurface stones and boulders are associated with the Plymouth soils in this map unit and may hinder excavation operations.

481B - Plymouth-Carver complex, undulating, bouldery.

These very deep, undulating, excessively well drained soils formed in ice-contact glacial deposits consisting of glacial outwash and ablation till. This complex of Plymouth and Carver soils is mapped on moraines, outwash plains, and heads of outwash. Stones and boulders cover 0.1 to 1.0 percent of the surface.

The soils occur as areas so intricately mixed that separating them in mapping is not possible. The major difference between the two soils in this complex is related to the volume and type of coarse fragments found in the surface and subsoil. Plymouth soils have a higher percentage of cobble to stone size rock fragments than the Carver soils which lack the larger coarse fragments.

Included with these soils in mapping are areas of Hinckley, Windsor and Poquonock soils. Deerfield and Birchwood soils are in depressions. Also included are areas which lack the surface stones and boulders.

Soil Properties:

Permeability: rapid in the solum and very rapid in the substratum.
Available water capacity: low
Soil reaction: extremely acid to strongly acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: more than 6 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: N/A
Hydrologic group: A.
Hydric Soil: No.
Capability Subclass: IVs.
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Most areas are used as woodland. A few areas have been developed for homesites.

Suitability:

Crops:

These soils are poorly suited to cropland because of the low available water capacity and surface stones and boulders which, unless removed, restrict the use of equipment. Irrigation is needed for most cultivated crops. Mixing plant residue and manure into the surface layer helps to increase the water holding capacity. Farming on the contour or across the slope, terracing, strip-cropping, crop rotations, cover crops, and conservation tillage are practices that help reduce runoff and control erosion. These soils are poorly suited to hay and pasture. The main management objective is to prevent overgrazing that reduces the hardiness and density of desirable plants. Proper stocking rates, timely grazing, and restricted use during wet periods, help maintain plant densities and reduce surface compaction.

This map unit consists of soils which have developed in deep deposits of coarse sand and gravel. Most areas of these soils are excellent sources of sand for cranberry management. The Plymouth soils may require screening to remove large coarse fragments, large boulders may be encountered in deep excavations.

Woodland:

These soils are suited for woodland productivity. Droughtiness is a limitation that affects woodland management and some seedling loss is expected. Removal or control of competing vegetation will help to attain optimum growth of newly established seedlings. Trees most common to areas of these soils include pitch pine, white oak, scarlet oak, eastern white pine, and black oak.

Development:

These soils are suitable for building sites with or without basements. The droughty nature of these soils is a limitation for lawns, shallow rooted trees and shrubs. Adding a layer of topsoil and frequent watering during dry periods will help to overcome this limitation. The surface and subsurface stones and boulders may hamper site development. These soils readily absorb but may not adequately filter the effluent from septic tank absorption fields. The poor filtering capacity may result in the pollution of groundwater. Low density housing that reduces the volume of effluent entering the groundwater system will lessen the severity of the pollution hazard. Additional precautionary measures may be necessary in some areas.

481C - Plymouth-Carver complex, rolling, bouldery.

These very deep, rolling, excessively well drained soils formed in ice-contact glacial deposits consisting of glacial outwash and ablation till. This complex of Plymouth and Carver soils is mapped in areas of moraines, outwash plains, and outwash heads. Stones and boulders cover 0.1 to 1.0 percent of the surface.

The soils occur as areas so intricately mixed that separating them in mapping is not practical. The major difference between the two soils in this complex is related to the volume and type of coarse fragments found in the surface and subsoil. Plymouth soils have a higher percentage of cobble to stone size rock fragments than the Carver soils which lack the larger coarse fragments.

Included with these soils in mapping are areas of Hinckley, Windsor and Poquonock soils. Deerfield and Birchwood soils are in depressions. Also included are areas with isolated surface stones and boulders.

Soil Properties:

Permeability: rapid in the solum and very rapid in the substratum.
Available water capacity: low
Soil reaction: extremely acid to strongly acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: more than 6 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: N/A
Hydrologic group: A.
Hydric Soil: No.
Capability Subclass: IVs.
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Most areas are used as woodland. A few areas have been developed for homesites.

Suitability:

Crops:

These soils are poorly suited to cropland, hay and pasture because of low available water capacity, susceptibility to erosion, and the surface stones and boulders which, unless removed, restrict the use of equipment. Irrigation is needed for most cultivated crops. Mixing plant residue and manure into the surface layer helps to increase the water holding capacity of the soil. Farming on the contour or across the slope, terracing, stripcropping, crop rotations, cover crops, and conservation tillage are practices that help to reduce runoff and control erosion. The main management objective is to prevent overgrazing that reduces the hardiness and density of desirable plants. Proper stocking rates, timely grazing, and restricted use during wet periods, help maintain plant densities and reduce surface compaction.

This map unit consists of soils which have developed in deep deposits of coarse sand and gravel. Most areas of these soils are excellent sources of sand for cranberry management. The Plymouth soils may require screening to remove large coarse fragments, large boulders may be encountered in deep excavations.

Woodland:

These soils are suited for woodland productivity. Droughtiness is a limitation that affects woodland management and some seedling loss is expected. Removal or control of competing vegetation will help to attain optimum growth of newly established seedlings. Trees most common to areas of these soils include pitch pine, white oak, scarlet oak, eastern white pine, and black oak.

Development:

Slope is the main limitation for building sites. Land shaping is generally needed. Buildings and lots should be designed to conform to the natural slope of the land. There is a hazard of erosion during and after construction. Planting slopes to well adapted grasses as soon after disturbance as possible will help to minimize the erosion hazard. The surface and subsurface stones and boulders may hamper site development. These soils are poorly suited for septic tank absorption fields because of the steepness of slope and because the soil does not adequately filter the effluent. The poor filtering capacity may result in the pollution of groundwater. Low density housing that reduces the volume of effluent entering the ground-water system will lessen the severity of the pollution hazard. Installing distribution lines on the contour, or in areas that were graded during construction of the dwelling, will help to overcome the slope limitation. Additional precautionary measures may be necessary in some areas.

481D - Plymouth-Carver complex, hilly, bouldery.

These very deep, hilly and very steep, excessively well drained soils formed in ice-contact glacial deposits consisting of glacial outwash and ablation till. This complex of Plymouth and Carver soils is mapped in areas of moraines, outwash plains, and outwash heads. Stones and boulders cover 0.1 to 1.0 percent of the surface.

The soils occur as areas so intricately mixed that separating them in mapping is not possible. The major difference between the two soils in this complex is related to the volume and type of coarse fragments found in the surface and subsoil. Plymouth soils have a higher percentage of cobble to stone size rock fragments than the Carver soils which lack the larger coarse fragments.

Included with these soils in mapping are areas of Hinckley, Windsor and Poquonock soils. Deerfield and Birchwood soils are in depressions. Also included are areas with isolated surface stones and boulders.

Soil Properties:

Permeability: rapid in the solum and very rapid in the substratum.
Available water capacity: low
Soil reaction: extremely acid to strongly acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: more than 6 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: N/A
Hydrologic group: A.
Hydric Soil: No.
Capability Subclass: VIIs.
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Most areas are used as woodland. A few areas have been developed for homesites.

Suitability:

Crops:

These soils are generally unsuited to cultivated crops, hay and pasture because of the low available water capacity, steepness of slope, severe hazard of erosion, and the surface stones and boulders which, unless removed, restrict the use of equipment.

This map unit consists of soils which have developed in deep deposits of coarse sand and gravel. Most areas of these soils are excellent sources of sand for cranberry management. The Plymouth soils may require screening to remove large coarse fragments, large boulders may be encountered in deep excavations.

Woodland:

These soils are suited for woodland productivity. Droughtiness and steepness of slope are limitations that affect woodland management. Use of equipment may be hazardous on steeper slopes. Removal or control of competing vegetation will help to attain optimum growth of newly established seedlings. Trees most common to areas of these soils include pitch pine, white oak, scarlet oak, eastern white pine, and black oak.

Development:

Slope is the main limitation for building sites. Extensive land shaping is generally needed. Buildings and lots should be designed to conform to the natural slope of the land. There is a severe hazard of erosion during and after construction. Planting slopes to well adapted grasses as soon after disturbance as possible will help to minimize the erosion hazard. The surface and subsurface stones and boulders may hamper site development. These soils are poorly suited for septic tank absorption fields because of the steepness of slope and because the soil may not adequately filter the effluent. The poor filtering capacity may result in the pollution of groundwater. Low density housing that reduces the volume of effluent entering the groundwater system will lessen the severity of the pollution hazard. Installing distribution lines on the contour, or in areas that were graded during construction of the dwelling, will help to overcome the slope limitation. Additional precautionary measures may be necessary in some cases. Subsurface stones and boulders are associated with the Plymouth soils in this map unit and may hinder excavation operations.

483C - Plymouth-Barnstable complex, very bouldery, rolling

These undulating and rolling, very deep, excessively drained and well drained soils are on the side slopes of moraines. Stones and boulders cover 1 to 3 percent of the surface. Slopes range from 3 to 15 percent. This map unit is about 55 percent Plymouth soil, 30 percent Barnstable soil, and 15 percent other soils. The soils occur as areas so intricately mixed or so small that separating them in mapping is not practical.

Typically, the surface of the Plymouth soil is covered with an organic layer. This layer is about 1 inch of loose, undecomposed pine needles, leaves, and twigs and 1 inch of partly decomposed and well decomposed organic material. The surface layer is about 3 inches thick. It is black, very friable loamy coarse sand in the upper 1 inch and gray, loose coarse sand in the lower 2 inches. The subsoil is about 26 inches thick. In sequence downward, it is 1 inch of dark brown, very friable gravelly loamy coarse sand; 5 inches of strong brown, very friable gravelly loamy coarse sand; 1 0 inches of yellowish brown, very friable gravelly loamy coarse sand; and 10 inches of light yellowish brown, loose gravelly coarse sand. The substratum extends to a depth of 65 inches or more. It is light brownish gray, loose gravelly coarse sand in the upper 12 inches and pale brown, loose coarse sand in the lower part.

Typically, the surface of the Barnstable soil is covered with an organic layer. This layer is about 1 inch of undecomposed pine needles, leaves, and twigs and 2 inches of partly decomposed and well decomposed organic material. The surface layer is dark gray, very friable sandy loam about 1 inch thick. The subsoil is friable sandy loam about 22 inches thick. The upper 1 inch is dark brown, the next 7 inches is yellowish brown, and the lower 14 inches is light olive brown. The substratum to a depth of 65 inches or more is light yellowish brown, loose coarse sand.

Included with these soils in mapping are small areas of Carver, Hinckley, and Merrimac soils. Also included are areas where slopes are less than 3 percent or more than 15 percent and small, isolated areas that do not have boulders on the surface.

Permeability is rapid in the subsoil of the Plymouth soil and very rapid in the substratum. Available water capacity is low. Depth to the seasonal high water table is more than 6 feet.

Permeability is moderately rapid in the subsoil of the Barnstable soil and rapid or very rapid in the substratum. Available water capacity is moderate. Depth to the seasonal high water table is more than 6 feet.

Most areas are used as woodland. A few areas have been developed for homesites.

Suitability:

Crops:

These soils are unsuitable as cropland because the surface stones and boulders interfere with the use of equipment. The Barnstable soil is suited to cultivated crops, however, if the stones and boulders are removed. The Plymouth soil is droughty during periods of low rainfall.

These soils are suited to native pasture. They are poorly suited to hay and improved pasture because the use of equipment is limited by the surface stones and boulders. The main management objective is the prevention of overgrazing, which reduces the hardiness and density of desirable plants. Proper stocking rates, timely grazing, and restricted use during wet periods help to maintain plant density and minimize surface compaction.

Woodland:

These soils are suited to woodland. The Plymouth soil is droughty. As a result, some seedling loss is expected. The use of equipment may be hampered because of the boulders. Thinning dense stands to standard stocking levels results in more vigorous tree growth. Removal or control of competing vegetation helps to obtain the best growth of newly established seedlings. The most common trees are pitch pine, white oak, scarlet oak, eastern white pine, and black oak.

Development:

Areas of these soils that have slopes of more than 8 percent are limited as sites for buildings. Land grading is generally needed. Buildings and lots should be designed so that they conform to the natural slope of the land. Erosion is a hazard during and after construction. Planting well suited grasses as soon as possible after the surface is disturbed minimizes the erosion hazard. The surface and subsurface stones and boulders may hamper site development.

These soils are limited as sites for septic tank absorption fields because of the slope and the rapid or very rapid permeability. The soils may not adequately filter the effluent. The poor filtering capacity may result in the pollution of ground water. The hazard of pollution increases with the density of housing. Installing the distribution lines on the contour or in areas that were graded during construction of the dwelling helps to overcome the slope. Precautionary measures may be necessary in some areas.

The capability subclass is VIs.

 

483D - Plymouth-Barnstable complex, very bouldery, hilly

These hilly and steep, very deep, excessively drained and well drained soils are on hills and ridges on moraines. Stones and boulders cover 1 to 3 percent of the surface. Slopes range from 15 to 35 percent. This map unit complex is about 55 percent Plymouth soil, 30 percent Barnstable soil, and 15 percent other soils. The soils occur as areas so intricately mixed or so small that separating them in mapping is not practical.

Typically, the surface of the Plymouth soil is covered with an organic layer. This layer is about 1 inch of loose, undecomposed pine needles, leaves, and twigs and 1 inch of partly decomposed and well decomposed organic material. The surface layer is about 3 inches thick. It is black, very friable loamy coarse sand in the upper 1 inch and gray, loose coarse sand in the lower 2 inches. The subsoil is about 26 inches thick. In sequence downward, it is 1 inch of dark brown, very friable gravelly loamy coarse sand; 5 inches of strong brown, very friable gravelly loamy coarse sand; 10 inches of yellowish brown, very friable gravelly loamy coarse sand; and 1 0 inches of light yellowish brown, loose gravelly coarse sand. The substratum extends to a depth of 65 inches or more. It is light brownish gray, loose gravelly coarse sand in the upper 12 inches and pale brown, loose coarse sand in the lower part.

Typically, the surface of the Barnstable soil is covered with an organic layer. This layer is about 1 inch of undecomposed pine needles, leaves, and twigs and 2 inches of partly decomposed and well decomposed organic material. The surface layer is dark gray, very friable sandy loam about 1 inch thick. The subsoil is friable sandy loam about 22 inches thick. The upper 1 inch is dark brown, the next 7 inches is yellowish brown, and the lower 14 inches is light olive brown. The substratum to a depth of 65 inches or more is light yellowish brown, loose coarse sand.

Included with these soils in mapping are small areas of Carver, Hinckley, and Merrimac soils and small areas where slopes are less than 15 percent. Also included are small, isolated areas that do not have boulders on the surface. Included soils make up about 15 percent of this unit.

Permeability is rapid in the subsoil of the Plymouth soil and very rapid in the substratum. Available water capacity is low. Depth to the seasonal high water table is more than 6 feet.

Permeability is moderately rapid in the subsoil of the Barnstable soil and rapid or very rapid in the substratum. Available water capacity is moderate. Depth to the seasonal high water table is more than 6 feet.

Most areas are used as woodland.

Suitability:

Crops:

These soils are unsuitable as cropland because the surface stones and boulders restrict the use of equipment. Erosion is a hazard because of the slope. The Plymouth soil is droughty during periods of low rainfall.

These soils are suited to native pasture. They are poorly suited to hay and improved pasture because the use of equipment is limited by the slope and the stones and boulders on the surface. The main management objective is the prevention of overgrazing, which reduces the hardiness and density of desirable plants. Proper stocking rates, timely grazing, and restricted use during wet periods help to maintain plant density and minimize surface compaction.

Woodland:

These soils are suited to woodland. The Plymouth soil is droughty. As a result, some seedling loss is expected. The use of equipment may be hampered because of the slope and the boulders. Thinning dense stands to standard stocking levels results in more vigorous tree growth. Removal or control of competing vegetation helps to obtain the best growth of newly established seedlings. The most common trees are pitch pine, white oak, scarlet oak, eastern white pine, and black oak.

Development:

The slope is a limitation if these soils are used as sites for buildings. Extensive land shaping is generally needed. Buildings and lots should be designed so that they conform to the natural slope of the land. Erosion is a severe hazard during and after construction. Planting well suited grasses as soon as possible after the surface is disturbed minimizes the erosion hazard. The surface and subsurface stones and boulders may hamper site development.

These soils are limited as sites for septic tank absorption fields because of the slope and the rapid or very rapid permeability. The soils may not adequately filter the effluent. The poor filtering capacity may result in the pollution of ground water. The hazard of pollution increases with the density of housing. Installing the distribution lines on the contour or in areas that were graded during construction of the dwelling helps to overcome the slope. Precautionary measures may be necessary in some areas.

The capability subclass is Vls.

486B - Plymouth-Barnstable complex, undulating

These undulating, very deep, excessively drained and well drained soils are on the side slopes of moraines. Slopes range from 0 to 5 percent. This map unit is about 55 percent Plymouth soil, 30 percent Barnstable soil, and 15 percent other soils. The soils occur as areas so intricately mixed or so small that separating them in mapping is not practical.

Typically, the surface of the Plymouth soil is covered with an organic layer. This layer is about 1 inch of loose, undecomposed pine needles, leaves, and twigs and 1 inch of partly decomposed and well decomposed organic material. The surface layer is about 3 inches thick. It is black, very friable loamy coarse sand in the upper 1 inch and gray, loose coarse sand in the lower 2 inches. The subsoil is about 26 inches thick. In sequence downward, it is 1 inch of dark brown, very friable gravelly loamy coarse sand; 5 inches of strong brown, very friable gravelly loamy coarse sand; 1 0 inches of yellowish brown, very friable gravelly loamy coarse sand; and 10 inches of light yellowish brown, loose gravelly coarse sand. The substratum extends to a depth of 65 inches or more. It is light brownish gray, loose gravelly coarse sand in the upper 12 inches and pale brown, loose coarse sand in the lower part.

Typically, the surface of the Barnstable soil is covered with an organic layer. This layer is about 1 inch of undecomposed pine needles, leaves, and twigs and 2 inches of partly decomposed and well decomposed organic material. The surface layer is dark gray, very friable sandy loam about 1 inch thick. The subsoil is friable sandy loam about 22 inches thick. The upper 1 inch is dark brown, the next 7 inches is yellowish brown, and the lower 14 inches is light olive brown. The substratum to a depth of 65 inches or more is light yellowish brown, loose coarse sand.

Included with these soils in mapping are small areas of Carver, Hinckley, and Merrimac soils. Also included are areas where slopes are less than 3 percent or more than 15 percent and small, isolated areas that have boulders on the surface.

Permeability is rapid in the subsoil of the Plymouth soil and very rapid in the substratum. Available water capacity is low. Depth to the seasonal high water table is more than 6 feet.

Permeability is moderately rapid in the subsoil of the Barnstable soil and rapid or very rapid in the substratum. Available water capacity is moderate. Depth to the seasonal high water table is more than 6 feet.

Most areas are used as woodland. A few areas have been developed for homesites.

Suitability:

Crops:

The Barnstable soil is suited to cultivated crops. The Plymouth soil is droughty during periods of low rainfall.

These soils are suited to native pasture. The main management objective is the prevention of overgrazing, which reduces the hardiness and density of desirable plants. Proper stocking rates, timely grazing, and restricted use during wet periods help to maintain plant density and minimize surface compaction.

Woodland:

These soils are suited to woodland. The Plymouth soil is droughty. As a result, some seedling loss is expected. The use of equipment may be hampered because of the boulders. Thinning dense stands to standard stocking levels results in more vigorous tree growth. Removal or control of competing vegetation helps to obtain the best growth of newly established seedlings. The most common trees are pitch pine, white oak, scarlet oak, eastern white pine, and black oak.

Development:

Erosion is a hazard during and after construction. Planting well suited grasses as soon as possible after the surface is disturbed minimizes the erosion hazard. The subsurface stones and boulders may hamper site development.

These soils are limited as sites for septic tank absorption fields because of the slope and the rapid or very rapid permeability. The soils may not adequately filter the effluent. The poor filtering capacity may result in the pollution of ground water. The hazard of pollution increases with the density of housing. Installing the distribution lines on the contour or in areas that were graded during construction of the dwelling helps to overcome the slope. Precautionary measures may be necessary in some areas.

The capability subclass is VIs.

486C - Plymouth-Barnstable complex, rolling

These rolling, very deep, excessively drained and well drained soils are on the side slopes of moraines. Slopes range from 5 to 15 percent. This map unit is about 55 percent Plymouth soil, 30 percent Barnstable soil, and 15 percent other soils. The soils occur as areas so intricately mixed or so small that separating them in mapping is not practical.

Typically, the surface of the Plymouth soil is covered with an organic layer. This layer is about 1 inch of loose, undecomposed pine needles, leaves, and twigs and 1 inch of partly decomposed and well decomposed organic material. The surface layer is about 3 inches thick. It is black, very friable loamy coarse sand in the upper 1 inch and gray, loose coarse sand in the lower 2 inches. The subsoil is about 26 inches thick. In sequence downward, it is 1 inch of dark brown, very friable gravelly loamy coarse sand; 5 inches of strong brown, very friable gravelly loamy coarse sand; 1 0 inches of yellowish brown, very friable gravelly loamy coarse sand; and 10 inches of light yellowish brown, loose gravelly coarse sand. The substratum extends to a depth of 65 inches or more. It is light brownish gray, loose gravelly coarse sand in the upper 12 inches and pale brown, loose coarse sand in the lower part.

Typically, the surface of the Barnstable soil is covered with an organic layer. This layer is about 1 inch of undecomposed pine needles, leaves, and twigs and 2 inches of partly decomposed and well decomposed organic material. The surface layer is dark gray, very friable sandy loam about 1 inch thick. The subsoil is friable sandy loam about 22 inches thick. The upper 1 inch is dark brown, the next 7 inches is yellowish brown, and the lower 14 inches is light olive brown. The substratum to a depth of 65 inches or more is light yellowish brown, loose coarse sand.

Included with these soils in mapping are small areas of Carver, Hinckley, and Merrimac soils. Also included are areas where slopes are less than 3 percent or more than 15 percent and small, isolated areas that have boulders on the surface.

Permeability is rapid in the subsoil of the Plymouth soil and very rapid in the substratum. Available water capacity is low. Depth to the seasonal high water table is more than 6 feet.

Permeability is moderately rapid in the subsoil of the Barnstable soil and rapid or very rapid in the substratum. Available water capacity is moderate. Depth to the seasonal high water table is more than 6 feet.

Most areas are used as woodland. A few areas have been developed for homesites.

Suitability:

Crops:

The Barnstable soil is suited to cultivated crops. The Plymouth soil is droughty during periods of low rainfall.

These soils are suited to native pasture. The main management objective is the prevention of overgrazing, which reduces the hardiness and density of desirable plants. Proper stocking rates, timely grazing, and restricted use during wet periods help to maintain plant density and minimize surface compaction.

Woodland:

These soils are suited to woodland. The Plymouth soil is droughty. As a result, some seedling loss is expected. The use of equipment may be hampered because of the boulders. Thinning dense stands to standard stocking levels results in more vigorous tree growth. Removal or control of competing vegetation helps to obtain the best growth of newly established seedlings. The most common trees are pitch pine, white oak, scarlet oak, eastern white pine, and black oak.

Development:

Areas of these soils that have slopes of more than 8 percent are limited as sites for buildings. Land grading is generally needed. Buildings and lots should be designed so that they conform to the natural slope of the land. Erosion is a hazard during and after construction. Planting well suited grasses as soon as possible after the surface is disturbed minimizes the erosion hazard. The subsurface stones and boulders may hamper site development.

These soils are limited as sites for septic tank absorption fields because of the slope and the rapid or very rapid permeability. The soils may not adequately filter the effluent. The poor filtering capacity may result in the pollution of ground water. The hazard of pollution increases with the density of housing. Installing the distribution lines on the contour or in areas that were graded during construction of the dwelling helps to overcome the slope. Precautionary measures may be necessary in some areas.

The capability subclass is VIs.

486D - Plymouth-Barnstable complex, hilly

These hilly and steep, very deep, excessively drained and well drained soils are on hills and ridges on moraines. Slopes range from 15 to 35 percent. This map unit complex is about 55 percent Plymouth soil, 30 percent Barnstable soil, and 15 percent other soils. The soils occur as areas so intricately mixed or so small that separating them in mapping is not practical.

Typically, the surface of the Plymouth soil is covered with an organic layer. This layer is about 1 inch of loose, undecomposed pine needles, leaves, and twigs and 1 inch of partly decomposed and well decomposed organic material. The surface layer is about 3 inches thick. It is black, very friable loamy coarse sand in the upper 1 inch and gray, loose coarse sand in the lower 2 inches. The subsoil is about 26 inches thick. In sequence downward, it is 1 inch of dark brown, very friable gravelly loamy coarse sand; 5 inches of strong brown, very friable gravelly loamy coarse sand; 10 inches of yellowish brown, very friable gravelly loamy coarse sand; and 1 0 inches of light yellowish brown, loose gravelly coarse sand. The substratum extends to a depth of 65 inches or more. It is light brownish gray, loose gravelly coarse sand in the upper 12 inches and pale brown, loose coarse sand in the lower part.

Typically, the surface of the Barnstable soil is covered with an organic layer. This layer is about 1 inch of undecomposed pine needles, leaves, and twigs and 2 inches of partly decomposed and well decomposed organic material. The surface layer is dark gray, very friable sandy loam about 1 inch thick. The subsoil is friable sandy loam about 22 inches thick. The upper 1 inch is dark brown, the next 7 inches is yellowish brown, and the lower 14 inches is light olive brown. The substratum to a depth of 65 inches or more is light yellowish brown, loose coarse sand.

Included with these soils in mapping are small areas of Carver, Hinckley, and Merrimac soils and small areas where slopes are less than 15 percent. Also included are small, isolated areas that have boulders on the surface. Included soils make up about 15 percent of this unit.

Permeability is rapid in the subsoil of the Plymouth soil and very rapid in the substratum. Available water capacity is low. Depth to the seasonal high water table is more than 6 feet.

Permeability is moderately rapid in the subsoil of the Barnstable soil and rapid or very rapid in the substratum. Available water capacity is moderate. Depth to the seasonal high water table is more than 6 feet.

Most areas are used as woodland.

Suitability:

Crops:

These soils are unsuitable as cropland because erosion is a hazard. The Plymouth soil is droughty during periods of low rainfall.

These soils are suited to native pasture. The main management objective is the prevention of overgrazing, which reduces the hardiness and density of desirable plants. Proper stocking rates, timely grazing, and restricted use during wet periods help to maintain plant density and minimize surface compaction.

Woodland:

These soils are suited to woodland. The Plymouth soil is droughty. As a result, some seedling loss is expected. The use of equipment may be hampered because of the slope and the boulders. Thinning dense stands to standard stocking levels results in more vigorous tree growth. Removal or control of competing vegetation helps to obtain the best growth of newly established seedlings. The most common trees are pitch pine, white oak, scarlet oak, eastern white pine, and black oak.

Development:

The slope is a limitation if these soils are used as sites for buildings. Extensive land shaping is generally needed. Buildings and lots should be designed so that they conform to the natural slope of the land. Erosion is a severe hazard during and after construction. Planting well suited grasses as soon as possible after the surface is disturbed minimizes the erosion hazard. The subsurface stones and boulders may hamper site development.

These soils are limited as sites for septic tank absorption fields because of the slope and the rapid or very rapid permeability. The soils may not adequately filter the effluent. The poor filtering capacity may result in the pollution of ground water. The hazard of pollution increases with the density of housing. Installing the distribution lines on the contour or in areas that were graded during construction of the dwelling helps to overcome the slope. Precautionary measures may be necessary in some areas.

The capability subclass is VIe.

 

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