103B - Charlton Hollis Rock outcrop complex, 3 to 8 percent slopes.

This map unit consists of gently sloping soils on uplands where the relief is affected by the underlying bedrock. The very deep, well drained Charlton soil is in low pockets. The shallow, excessively drained Hollis soil is on the tops of hills and ridges or near rock outcrops. In many areas stones and boulders 1 0 inches to 1 0 feet in diameter cover 0 to 1 0 percent of the surface, A typical map unit is about 47 percent Charlton soil, 18 percent Hollis soil, 10 percent Rock outcrop, and 25 percent other soils. These soils and areas of exposed bedrock are intermingled so closely that it was not practical to separate them at the scale used for mapping.

Typically, the surface layer of the Charlton soil is black fine sandy loam about 1 inch thick. The subsurface layer is dark brown fine sandy loam about 5 inches thick. The subsoil is yellowish brown fine sandy loam about 30 inches thick. The substratum is light brownish gray sandy loam to a depth of 60 inches or more. In some areas the surface layer is very fine sandy loam. In some areas the subsoil is redder.

Typically, the surface layer of the Hollis soil is black fine sandy loam about 3 inches thick. The subsoil is dark yellowish brown fine sandy loam about 1 1 inches thick. Bedrock is at a depth of 14 inches. In some areas the substratum is pale yellow fine sandy loam. The bedrock is granite, basalt, diorite, or conglomerate.

Included with this complex in mapping are small areas of Canton and Chatfield soils on the same landscape as the Charlton and Hollis soils. Also included are areas of Scituate soils and small, wet areas in depressions. Also included are areas of Montauk soils on smoother parts of the landscape and soils with bedrock between 40 and 60 inches. Included areas make up about 15 percent of this map unit.

Soil properties:

Permeability: Moderate or moderately rapid throughout in both Charlton and Hollis soils.

Available water capacity: Charlton soil-moderate; Hollis soil-low.

Soil reaction: Very strongly acid to moderately acid in both Charlton and Hollis soils.

Depth to bedrock: Charlton soil-more than 60 inches; Hollis soils-1 0 to 20 inches.

Depth to the seasonal high water table: More than 6 feet in both the Charlton and Hollis soils.

Hydrologic group.- Charlton-B: Hollis-C/D.

Capability Subclass: Vlls.

Flooding.Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.

Duration & Months: none.

Many areas of the Charlton and Hollis soils in this complex are woodland. Some areas are used as individual homesites.

Suitability:

Crops:

These soils are poorly suited to cultivated crops and to pastureland because of the exposed bedrock and stones on the surface.

Woodland:

Potential productivity for northern red oak on this soil is moderate. Management concerns are shallow depth to bedrock and low available water capacity. In some areas rock outcroppings restrict the use of equipment. Proper thinning of the stands helps to minimize the hazard of windthrow. Some areas are suitable for handplanting of trees.

Development:

The Charlton soil is well suited to use as sites for dwellings with basements and for septic tank absorption fields. The Hollis soil is poorly suited to use as sites for both dwellings with basements and septic tank absorption fields because it is less than 20 inches deep to bedrock. Some suitable homesites are on these soils, but a lot size larger than customary is generally needed. The Charlton soil is well suited to and the Hollis soil is poorly suited to lawns, landscaping, and gardens.

103C - Charlton Hollis Rock outcrop complex, 8 to 15 percent slopes

This map unit consists of strongly sloping soils on uplands where the underlying bedrock is near the surface. The very deep, well drained Charlton soil is in low pockets. The shallow, somewhat excessively drained Hollis soil is on the tops of hills and ridges near rock outcrops. Stones and boulders 1 0 inches to 1 0 feet in diameter cover 0 to 1 0 percent of the surface. A typical map unit is about 47 percent Charlton soil, 1 8 percent Hollis soil, 1 0 percent Rock outcrop, and 25 percent other soils. These soils and areas of exposed bedrock are intermingled so closely that it was not practical to separate them at the scale used for mapping.

Typically, the surface layer of the Charlton soil is black fine sandy loam about 1 inch thick. The subsurface layer is dark brown fine sandy loam about 5 inches thick. The subsoil is yellowish brown fine sandy loam about 30 inches thick. The substratum is light brownish gray sandy loam to a depth of 60 inches or more. In some areas the surface layer is very fine sandy loam. In some areas the subsoil is redder.

Typically, the surface layer of the Hollis soil is black fine sandy loam about 3 inches thick. The subsoil is dark yellowish brown fine sandy loam about 1 1 inches thick. Bedrock is at a depth of 14 inches. In areas the substratum is pale yellow fine sandy loam, The bedrock is granite, basalt, diorite, or conglomerate.

Included with this complex in mapping are small areas of Canton and Chatfield soils on the same landscape as the Charlton and Hollis soils. Also included are areas of Scituate soils and small, wet areas in depressions and along drainageways. Also included are areas of Montauk soils on smoother parts of the landscape and soils with bedrock between 40 and 60 inches. Also included are small areas of soils that have slopes of 1 5 to 25 percent. Included areas make up about 25 percent of this map unit.

Soil properties:

Permeability: Moderate or moderately rapid throughout in both Charlton and Hollis soils.

Available water capacity: Charlton soil-moderate; Hollis soil-low.

Soil reaction: Very strongly acid to moderately acid in both Charlton and Hollis soils.

Depth to bedrock: Charlton soil-more than 60 inches; Hollis soils-1 0 to 20 inches.

Depth to the seasonal high water table: More than 6 feet in both the Charlton and Hollis soils.

Hydrologic group.- Charlton-B: Hollis-C/D.

Capability Subclass: VIIs.

Flooding.Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.

Duration & Months: none.

Most areas of the Charlton and Hollis soils in this complex are woodland, Some areas are used as individual homesites.

Suitability:

Crops:

These soils are poorly suited to cultivated crops and to pastureland because of the exposed bedrock, slope, and stones on the surface.

Woodland:

Potential productivity for northern red oak on this soil is moderate. Management concerns are shallow depth to bedrock, low available water capacity, and slope. Rock outcrops and slope limit the use of equipment. Proper thinning of the stands will help to minimize the hazard of windthrow. Minimizing soil disturbance and retaining the sponge-like mulch of leaves help to absorb precipitation, to reduce runoff, and to control erosion. Some areas are suitable for hand-planting of trees.

Development:

This map unit occurs on bedrock controlled landforms with various types of underlying bedrock geology. Fractures and large faults in the bedrock provide the potential to transmit water rapidly to the aquifer without the benefits of treatment by the soil. Many areas of this unit are mapped in residential areas serviced by individual wells. Careful planning in these areas should be taken to protect the groundwater resources.

The Charlton soil is suited to use as sites for dwellings with basements. The Hollis soil is poorly suited to use as sites for both dwellings with basements and septic tank absorption fields because it is less than 20 inches deep to bedrock. Some suitable homesites are on these soils, but a lot size larger than customary is generally needed. When homesites are under construction, such conservation measures as diversions and temporary or permanent plant cover commonly will control erosion. Because of slope, installing cross-slope distribution lines for septic tank absorption fields is generally needed for proper operation.

104C - Hollis Rock outcrop Charlton complex, 3 to 15 percent slopes.

This map unit consists of gently sloping and strongly sloping soils and areas of exposed bedrock on hills and ridges where the relief is affected by the underlying bedrock. The shallow, somewhat excessively drained Hollis soil is on the tops of ridges or is near rock outcrops. The very deep, well drained Charlton soil is in low pockets and saddles. Stones and boulders 10 inches to 10 feet in diameter cover 0 to 15 percent of the surface. A typical map unit is about 30 percent Hollis soil, 30 percent Rock outcrop, 25 percent Charlton soil, and 15 percent other soils. These soils and areas of exposed bedrock are intermingled so closely that it was not practical to separate them at the scale used for mapping.

Typically, the surface layer of the Hollis soil is black fine sandy loam about 3 inches thick. The subsoil is dark yellowish brown fine sandy loam about 11 inches thick. Bedrock is at a depth of 14 inches. In some areas the substratum is pale yellow fine sandy loam. The bedrock is granite, basalt, diorite, or conglomerate.

Typically, the surface layer of the Charlton soil is black fine sandy loam about 1 inch thick. The subsurface layer is dark brown fine sandy loam about 5 inches thick. The subsoil is yellowish brown fine sandy loam about 30 inches thick. The substratum is light brownish gray sandy loam to a depth of 60 inches or more. In some areas the surface layer is very fine sandy loam. In some areas the subsoil is redder.

Included with this complex in mapping are small areas of moderately deep soils and Canton soils in saddles and on side slopes. Also included are small areas of Scituate soils in depressions. Also included are small areas of seeps or wet pockets and soils with bedrock between 40 and 60 inches. In some areas stones and boulders cover 1 to 15 percent of the surface. Included areas make up about 10 percent of the map unit.

Soil properties:

Permeability: Moderate or moderately rapid throughout in both Hollis and Charlton soils.

Available water capacity: Hollis soil-low; Charlton soil-moderate.

Soil reaction: Very strongly acid to moderately acid in both Hollis and Charlton soils.

Depth to bedrock: Hollis soil-10 to 20inches; Charlton soil-more than 60 inches.

Depth to the seasonal high water table: More than 6 feet in both the Hollis and Charlton soils.

Hydrologic group: Hollis-C/D; Charlton-B.

Hydric Soil: No.

Capability Subclass: VIIs.

Flooding.Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.

Duration & Months: none.

Most of the soils in this complex are woodland. A few areas are used as individual homesites.

Suitability:

Crops:

These soils are fairly suited to pasture, but exposed bedrock, stones, and boulders on the surface nearly prohibit pasture maintenance and renovation with conventional farm equipment. These soils are poorly suited to cultivated crops.

Woodland:

Potential productivity for northern red oak on this soil is moderate. The shallow depth to bedrock and low available water capacity on the Hollis soil are management concerns. Rock outcrops generally limit the use of equipment. Some areas are suitable for hand-planting of trees.

Development:

This map unit occurs on bedrock controlled landforms with various types of underlying bedrock geology. Fractures and large faults in the bedrock provide the potential to transmit water rapidly to the aquifer without the benefits of treatment by the soil. Many areas of this unit are mapped in residential areas serviced by individual wells. Careful planning in these areas should be taken to protect the groundwater resources.

Slope is the main limitation to use of these soils as building sites. On the Hollis soil, shallow depth to bedrock is also a limitation. Extensive land shaping and blasting of bedrock are generally needed. Constructing roads on the contour, if possible, and planting roadbanks to well adapted grasses help to control erosion. In some areas the underlying bedrock limits road construction. The underlying bedrock and slope are the main limitations to use of the soils as sites for septic tank absorption fields, Installing the distribution lines across the slope is generally needed for proper operation. In many areas the bedrock limits installation operations. It is difficult to find suitable sites for septic tank absorption fields unless building lots on these soils are more than 2 acres in size.

The very deep Charlton soil in this map unit is well suited to lawns, landscaping. and gardens.

104D - Hollis Rock outcrop Charlton complex, 15 to 35 percent slopes.

This map unit consists of moderately steep soils and areas of exposed bedrock on hills and ridges where relief is controlled by the underlying bedrock. In a typical area it is about 30 percent Hollis soil, 30 percent Rock outcrop, 25 percent Charlton soil. and 15 percent other soils. The soils and areas of exposed bedrock in this complex are intermingled so closely that it was not practical to separate them in mapping at the scale used for mapping. The shallow, somewhat excessively drained Hollis soil is on the tops of ridges or is near rock outcrops. The very deep, well drained Charlton soil is on side slopes and foot slopes. Stones and boulders 10 inches to 10 feet in diameter cover 0 to 15 percent of the surface.

Typically, the surface layer of the Hollis soil is black fine sandy loam about 2 inches thick. The subsoil is dark yellowish brown fine sandy loam about 11 inches thick. Bedrock is at a depth of 14 inches. In some areas the substratum is pale yellow fine sandy loam. The bedrock is granite, basalt, diorite, or conglomerate.

Typically, the surface layer of the Charlton soil is black fine sandy loam about 1 inch thick. The subsurface layer is dark brown fine sandy loam about 5 inches thick. The subsoil is yellowish brown fine sandy loam about 30 inches thick. The substratum is light brownish gray sandy loam to a depth of 60 inches or more. In some areas the surface layer is very fine sandy loam. In some areas the subsoil is redder.

Included with this complex in mapping are small areas of moderately deep soils and areas of Canton soils on side slopes. Also included are small areas of seeps or wet pockets and soils with bedrock between 40 and 60 inches. Stones and boulders cover 1 to 15 percent of the surface. Included areas make up about 10 percent of the map unit.

Soil properties:

Permeability: Moderate or moderately rapid throughout in both Hollis and Charlton soils.

Available water capacity: Hollis soil-low; Charlton soil-moderate.

Soil reaction: Hollis soil-very strongly acid or strongly acid; Charlton soil-very strongly acid to moderately acid.

Depth to bedrock: Hollis soil-10 to 20 inches: Charlton soil-more than 60 inches.

Depth to the seasonal high water table: More than 6 feet in both Hollis and Charlton soils.

Hydrologic group: Hollis-C/D; Charlton-B.

Hydric Soil: No.

Capability Subclass: VIIs.

Flooding.Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.

Duration & Months: none.

Most of the soils in this complex are woodland. A few small areas are used as individual homesites.

Suitability:

Crops:

This map unit is generally not suited to cultivated crops and pasture because of slope and, on the Hollis soil, shallow depth to bedrock.

Woodland:

Potential productivity for northern red oak on these soils is moderate. Management concerns are slope and, on the Hollis soil, shallow depth to bedrock and low available water capacity. Rock outcrops restrict the use of equipment. Some areas are suitable for handplanting of trees.

Development:

This map unit occurs on bedrock controlled landforms with various types of underlying bedrock geology. Fractures and large faults in the bedrock provide the potential to transmit water rapidly to the aquifer without the benefits of treatment by the soil. Many areas of this unit are mapped in residential areas serviced by individual wells. Careful planning in these areas should be taken to protect the groundwater resources.

Slope is the main limitation to use of these soils as building sites. In addition, on the Hollis soil, shallow depth to bedrock is also a limitation. Extensive land shaping and blasting of bedrock are generally necessary. Constructing roads on the contour, if possible, and planting roadbanks to well adapted grasses help to control erosion. In some areas the underlying bedrock limits road construction, The underlying bedrock and slope are the main limitations to use of these soils as sites for septic tank absorption fields. Installing the distribution lines across the slope is generally needed for proper operation. In many areas bedrock limits installation operations.

105C - Rock outcrop-Hollis complex, rolling.

This map unit consists of areas of exposed bedrock and nearly level to steep, shallow, somewhat excessively drained Hollis soil. It is on tops and along ridge lines of steep upland hills and in coastal areas along Boston Bay. In a typical area it is about 55 percent Rock outcrop, 40 percent Hollis soil, and 5 percent other soils. The areas of exposed bedrock and the Hollis soil in this map unit are intermingled so closely that it was not practical to separate them at the scale used for mapping.

Typically, the surface layer of the Hollis soil is black fine sandy loam about 3 inches thick. The subsoil is dark yellowish brown fine sandy loam about 11 inches thick. Bedrock is at a depth of about 14 inches. In some areas the substratum is yellowish brown fine sandy loam. The bedrock is granite, basalt, diorite, or conglomerate.

Included with this unit in mapping are small areas of moderately deep Chatfield soils and very deep Canton soils. Soils with bedrock between 40 and 60 inches are also included. Very poorly drained Whitman and Swansea soils are in depressions and along drainageways. In some areas slopes range to as much as 45 percent. Included areas make up about 10 percent of the map unit.

Soil properties of the Hollis soil:

Permeability: Moderate or moderately rapid throughout.

Available water capacity: Low.

Soil reaction.- Strongly acid or moderately acid.

Depth to bedrock.- 1 0 to 20 inches.

Depth to the seasonal high water table.- More than 6 feet.

Hydrologic group: C/D.

Hydric Soils: No.

Capability Subclass: VIIs.

Flooding.Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.

Duration & Months: none.

 

Most areas of the Hollis soil are woodland. Many areas are used as parks and reservations. A few areas are used for radio, TV, or microwave transmission towers.

Suitability:

Extensive exposures of bedrock and the shallow Hollis soil of this map unit are generally not suitable to most uses. It is best suited to use as habitat for woodland wildlife and to recreational use such as hiking.

Potential productivity for northern red oak on this soil is moderate. Management concerns are shallow depth to bedrock and low available water capacity. Bedrock outcrops restrict the use of equipment. Some areas are suitable for hand-planting of trees.

The Hollis soil is generally not suitable for building site development and for use as sites for septic tank absorption fields. Areas that are better suited to these uses are generally nearby.

This map unit occurs on bedrock controlled landforms with various types of underlying bedrock geology. Fractures and large faults in the bedrock provide the potential to transmit water rapidly to the aquifer without the benefits of treatment by the soil. Many areas of this unit are mapped in residential areas serviced by individual wells. Careful planning in these areas should be taken to protect the groundwater resources.

105D Rock outcrop Hollis, hilly.

This map unit consists of areas of exposed bedrock and nearly level to steep, shallow, somewhat excessively drained Hollis soil. It is on tops and along ridge lines of steep upland hills and in coastal areas along Boston Bay. In a typical area it is about 55 percent Rock outcrop, 40 percent Hollis soil, and 5 percent other soils. The areas of exposed bedrock and the Hollis soil in this map unit are intermingled so closely that it was not practical to separate them at the scale used for mapping.

Typically, the surface layer of the Hollis soil is black fine sandy loam about 3 inches thick. The subsoil is dark yellowish brown fine sandy loam about 11 inches thick. Bedrock is at a depth of about 14 inches. In some areas the substratum is yellowish brown fine sandy loam. The bedrock is granite, basalt, diorite, or conglomerate.

Included with this unit in mapping are small areas of moderately deep Chatfield soils and very deep Canton soils. Soils with bedrock between 40 and 60 inches are also included. Very poorly drained Whitman and Swansea soils are in depressions and along drainageways. In some areas slopes range to as much as 45 percent. Included areas make up about 10 percent of the map unit.

Soil properties of the Hollis soil:

Permeability: Moderate or moderately rapid throughout.

Available water capacity: Low.

Soil reaction.- Strongly acid or moderately acid.

Depth to bedrock.- 1 0 to 20 inches.

Depth to the seasonal high water table.- More than 6 feet.

Hydrologic group: C/D.

Hydric Soils: No.

Capability Subclass: VIIs.

Flooding.Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.

Duration & Months: none.

 

Most areas of the Hollis soil are woodland. Many areas are used as parks and reservations. A few areas are used for radio, TV, or microwave transmission towers.

Suitability:

Extensive exposures of bedrock and the shallow Hollis soil of this map unit are generally not suitable to most uses. It is best suited to use as habitat for woodland wildlife and to recreational use such as hiking.

Potential productivity for northern red oak on this soil is moderate. Management concerns are shallow depth to bedrock and low available water capacity. Bedrock outcrops restrict the use of equipment. Some areas are suitable for hand-planting of trees.

The Hollis soil is generally not suitable for building site development and for use as sites for septic tank absorption fields. Areas that are better suited to these uses are generally nearby.

This map unit occurs on bedrock controlled landforms with various types of underlying bedrock geology. Fractures and large faults in the bedrock provide the potential to transmit water rapidly to the aquifer without the benefits of treatment by the soil. Many areas of this unit are mapped in residential areas serviced by individual wells. Careful planning in these areas should be taken to protect the groundwater resources.

 

110B - Canton-Chatfield-Rock outcrop complex, undulating.

This complex consists of undulating, very deep to shallow soils on uplands where the relief is affected by the underlying bedrock. The very deep, well drained Canton soils are at toeslopes and in deep pockets. The moderately deep, well drained Chatfield soils are on sideslopes and near hilltops. Stones, boulders and ledge, 10 inches to 10 feet in diameter, cover 0 to 15 percent of the surface. The soils and exposed bedrock in this complex are so intermingled that it is not practical to map them separately. This complex is about 55 percent Canton soils, 30 percent Chatfield soils, and 15 percent rock outcrop and other soils. Slopes range from 1 to 15 percent.

Included in this mapping complex on similar landscape positions are areas of Plymouth and Montauk soils and soils that are 40 to 60 inches to bedrock. Scituate, Newfields and Freetown soils occur in small wet areas and in depressions.

Typically, the surface layer is black fine sandy loam about 1 inch thick. The subsurface layer is dark gray fine sandy loam about 1 inch thick. The subsoil is about 20 inches thick. It is yellowish brown fine sandy loam in the upper part and light yellowish brown fine sandy loam in the lower part. The substratum is gravelly loamy sand to a depth of 60 inches or more. It is light olive gray in the upper part and olive gray in the lower part. Some areas have more gravel in the subsoil, and some areas have less gravel in the substratum.

Soil properties: Canton soils

Permeability: moderately rapid in the surface layer and subsoil, moderately rapid to moderately slow in the substratum.

Available water capacity: low.

Soil reaction: very strongly acid to moderately acid throughout.

Depth to bedrock: greater than 60 inches.

Seasonal high water table: Depth: greater than six feet.

Type & Months: N/A

Hydrologic group: B.

Hydric Soil: No.

Capability Subclass: VIs.

Flooding.Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.

Duration & Months: none.

Chatfield soils typically have a very dark greyish-brown and dark brown loam surface layer 7 inches thick. The subsoil from 7 to 24 inches is brown, flaggy silt loam. Bedrock underlies the soil at 20 to 40 inches below the surface. Some areas have a substratum of pale yellow fine sandy loam. The bedrock is most commonly granite, gneiss, schist, phyllite, or conglomerate.

Soil Properties: Chatfield soils.

Permeability: moderate or moderately rapid.

Available water capacity: low to moderate.

Soil reaction: very strongly acid through medium acid throughout.

Depth to bedrock: 20 to 40 inches.

Seasonal high water table: Depth: greater than six feet.

Type & Months: N/A

Hydrologic group: B.

Hydric Soil: No

Capability Subclass: VIe

Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.

Duration & Months: none.

Most areas of this complex are in woodland, some areas are used for individual homesites.

Suitability:

Crops:

This complex is suited to pasture, but exposed bedrock and stones on the surface make it poorly suited to cultivated crops.

Woodland:

This map unit is poorly suited for woodland productivity because of shallow depth to bedrock and low available water capacity. Optimum growth and survival are not expected. Equipment operations may be restricted because of bedrock outcroppings and moderately steep slopes. On-site investigations may reveal that tree plantings are practical with special treatment.

Development:

This map unit occurs on bedrock controlled landforms with various types of underlying bedrock geology. Fractures and large faults in the bedrock provide the potential to transmit water rapidly to the aquifer without the benefits of treatment by the soil. Many areas of this unit are mapped in residential areas serviced by individual wells. Careful planning in these areas should be taken to protect the groundwater resources.

The Canton soil is well suited to dwellings with basements. The Chatfield and bedrock areas are poorly suited to dwellings with basements because they are less than 40 inches to bedrock. Suitable homesites can be located in this complex but the use of a larger than customary lot size may be necessary. The Canton component of this map unit has a high potential for septic tank absorption fields, however, intensive on-site investigations may be necessary to locate the Canton soils. The Canton and Chatfield soils are well suited to lawns, landscaping and gardens. The topography and depth to the underlying bedrock is very irregular in this map unit. The depth to bedrock may vary from the surface to greater than six feet within short distances.

110C - Canton-Chatfield-Rock outcrop complex, rolling.

This complex consists of rolling, very deep to shallow soils on uplands where the relief is affected by the underlying bedrock. The very deep, well drained Canton soils are at toeslopes and in deep pockets. The moderately deep, well drained Chatfield soils are on sideslopes and near hilltops. Stones, boulders, and ledge, 10 inches to 10 feet in diameter, cover 0 to 15 percent of the surface. The soils and exposed bedrock in this complex are so intermingled that it is not practical to map them separately. This complex is about 60 percent Canton soils, 30 percent Chatfield soils, and 10 percent rock outcrop and other soils. Slopes range from 15 to 35 percent.

Included in this complex in mapping on similar landscape positions are areas of Plymouth and Montauk soils and soils that are 40 to 60 inches to bedrock. Scituate, Newfields and Freetown soils occur in small wet areas and in depressions.

Canton soils typically have a surface layer is black fine sandy loam about 1 inch thick. The subsurface layer is dark gray fine sandy loam about 1 inch thick. The subsoil is about 20 inches thick. It is yellowish brown fine sandy loam in the upper part and light yellowish brown fine sandy loam in the lower part. The substratum is gravelly loamy sand to a depth of 60 inches or more. It is light olive gray in the upper part and olive gray in the lower part. Some areas have more gravel in the subsoil, and some areas have less gravel in the substratum.

Soil properties: Canton soils

Permeability: moderately rapid in the surface layer and subsoil, moderately rapid to moderately slow in the substratum.

Available water capacity: low.

Soil reaction: very strongly acid to moderately acid throughout.

Depth to bedrock: greater than 60 inches.

Seasonal high water table: Depth: greater than six feet.

Type & Months: N/A

Hydrologic group: B.

Hydric Soil: No.

Capability Subclass: VIs.

Flooding.Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.

Duration & Months: none.

Chatfield soils typically have a very dark greyish-brown and dark brown loam surface layer 7 inches thick. The subsoil from 7 to 24 inches is brown, flaggy silt loam. Bedrock underlies the soil at 20 to 40 inches below the surface. Some areas have a substratum of pale yellow fine sandy loam. The bedrock is most commonly granite, gneiss, schist, phyllite, or conglomerate.

Soil Properties: Chatfield soils.

Permeability: moderate or moderately rapid.

Available water capacity: low to moderate.

Soil reaction: very strongly acid through medium acid throughout.

Depth to bedrock: 20 to 40 inches.

Seasonal high water table: Depth: greater than six feet.

Type & Months: N/A

Hydrologic group: B.

Hydric Soil: No

Capability Subclass: VIe

Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.

Duration & Months: none.

Most areas of this complex are in woodland to which they are fairly suited, however, some areas are used for individual homesites. Areas of this complex can provide a scenic and picturesque setting and a creative opportunity for the unusual design of homes and small commercial buildings.

Suitability:

Crops:

This complex is suited to pasture, but exposed bedrock and stones on the surface make it poorly suited to cultivated crops.

Woodland:

This map unit is poorly suited for woodland productivity because of shallow depth to bedrock and low available water capacity. Optimum growth and survival are not expected. Equipment operations may be restricted because of bedrock outcroppings and moderately steep slopes. On-site investigations may reveal that tree plantings are practical with special treatment.

Development:

This map unit occurs on bedrock controlled landforms with various types of underlying bedrock geology. Fractures and large faults in the bedrock provide the potential to transmit water rapidly to the aquifer without the benefits of treatment by the soil. Many areas of this unit are mapped in residential areas serviced by individual wells. Careful planning in these areas should be taken to protect the groundwater resources.

Exposed bedrock, slope, shallowness to bedrock and an excess of stones and boulders on the surface make this complex poorly or very poorly suited to most uses. The moderately steep slopes make it necessary to grade and fill before installing foundations and other structures. The Canton soil is well suited to dwellings with basements, whereas, the Chatfield soils are poorly suited to dwellings with basements because they are less than 20 to 40 inches to bedrock. Suitable homesites can be located in this complex but the use of a larger than customary lot size may be necessary. The Canton component of this map unit has a high potential for septic tank absorption fields, however, intensive on-site investigations may be necessary to locate these areas. Installing the distribution lines across the slope is necessary for proper operation. The Canton and Chatfield soils are well suited to lawns, landscaping, and gardens. The topography and depth to the underlying bedrock is very irregular in this map unit. The depth to bedrock may vary from the surface to greater than six feet within short distances; a survey of the bedrock topography may aid in constuction plans.

 

111C - Chatfield - Rock outcrop - Canton complex, rolling.

This complex consists of undulating and rolling moderately deep soils, areas of exposed bedrock and very deep soils on hills and ridges where the relief is highly affected by the underlying bedrock. The moderately deep, well drained Chatfield soils are on the tops of ridges or are near rock outcrops. The very deep, well drained Canton soils are at toeslopes or in small low pockets and saddles. Stones and boulders, 10 inches to 10 feet in diameter, cover 0 to 15 percent of the surface. The soils and exposed bedrock in this complex are so intermingled that it was not practical to map them separately. This complex is about 35 percent Chatfield soils, 25 percent rock outcrop, 20 percent Canton soils, and 20 percent other soils. Slopes range from 3 to 15 percent.

Included with this complex in mapping are areas of soils that are areas of shallow Hollis soils (10 to 20 inches to bedrock), and soils with bedrock between 40 to 60 inches. Plymouth and Montauk soils are at toeslopes and sideslopes of the landscape. Areas of Scituate, Newfields and Freetown soils occur in depressions, small seeps or wet pockets.

Chatfield soils typically have a very dark greyish-brown and dark brown loam surface layer 7 inches thick. The subsoil from 7 to 24 inches is brown, flaggy silt loam. Bedrock underlies the soil at 20 to 40 inches below the surface. Some areas have a substratum of pale yellow fine sandy loam. The bedrock is most commonly granite, gneiss, schist, phyllite, or conglomerate.

Soil Properties: Chatfield soils.

Permeability: moderate or moderately rapid.

Available water capacity: low to moderate.

Soil reaction: very strongly acid through medium acid throughout.

Depth to bedrock: 20 to 40 inches.

Seasonal high water table: Depth: greater than six feet.

Type & Months: N/A

Hydrologic group: B.

Hydric Soil: No

Capability Subclass: VIe

Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.

Duration & Months: none.

Canton soils typically have a surface layer is black fine sandy loam about 1 inch thick. The subsurface layer is dark gray fine sandy loam about 1 inch thick. The subsoil is about 20 inches thick. It is yellowish brown fine sandy loam in the upper part and light yellowish brown fine sandy loam in the lower part. The substratum is gravelly loamy sand to a depth of 60 inches or more. It is light olive gray in the upper part and olive gray in the lower part. Some areas have more gravel in the subsoil, and some areas have less gravel in the substratum.

Soil properties: Canton soils

Permeability: moderately rapid in the surface layer and subsoil, moderately rapid to moderately slow in the substratum.

Available water capacity: low.

Soil reaction: very strongly acid to moderately acid throughout.

Depth to bedrock: greater than 60 inches.

Seasonal high water table: Depth: greater than six feet.

Type & Months: N/A

Hydrologic group: B.

Hydric Soil: No.

Capability Subclass: VIs.

Flooding.Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.

Duration & Months: none.

Most areas of this complex are in woodland and a few areas are used for individual homesites.

Suitability:

Crops:

This complex is fairly well suited to pasture, but exposed bedrock, stones, and boulders on the surface make pasture maintenance and renovation very difficult with conventional farming equipment. This complex is very poorly suited to cultivated crops.

Woodland:

This soil is poorly suited for woodland productivity because of shallow depth to bedrock and low available water capacity. Optimum tree growth and survival are not expected, however, on-site investigations may reveal that tree plantings are practical with special treatment. Equipment operations may be restricted because of bedrock outcroppings.

Development:

This map unit occurs on bedrock controlled landforms with various types of underlying bedrock geology. Fractures and large faults in the bedrock provide the potential to transmit water rapidly to the aquifer without the benefits of treatment by the soil. Many areas of this unit are mapped in residential areas serviced by individual wells. Careful planning in these areas should be taken to protect the groundwater resources.

Shallow depth to bedrock and slope are the main limitations for building sites. Extensive land shaping and blasting of bedrock is generally necessary. Constructing roads on the contour when possible and planting roadbanks to well adapted grasses will help to reduce the erosion hazard but underlying bedrock may hinder construction in some areas. This complex has very low potential for septic tank absorption fields due to the lack of soil depth. Locating the Canton components of this map unit and installing the distribution lines across the slope are necessary for proper operation. It is difficult to locate suitable sites for septic tank absorption fields on building lots that are less than 2 acres in size. The Canton soils are well suited to lawns, landscaping and vegetable gardens. The topography and depth to the underlying bedrock is very irregular in this map unit; the depth to bedrock may vary from the surface to greater than six feet within short distances.

111D - Chatfield - Rock outcrop - Canton complex, hilly.

This complex consists of hilly and very hilly moderately deep soils, areas of exposed bedrock and very deep soils on hills and ridges. The relief is highly affected by the underlying bedrock. The moderately deep, well drained Chatfield soils are on the tops of ridges or are near rock outcrops. The very deep, well drained Canton soils are at toeslopes or in small low pockets and saddles. Stones and boulders, 10 inches to 10 feet in diameter, cover 0 to 15 percent of the surface. The soils and exposed bedrock in this complex are so intermingled that it was not practical to map them separately. This complex is about 35 percent Chatfield soils, 25 percent rock outcrop, 20 percent Canton soils, and 20 percent other soils.. Slopes range from 15 to 35 percent.

Included with this complex in mapping are areas of soils that are 10 to 20 inches to bedrock, and 40 to 60 inches to bedrock. Plymouth and Montauk soils are at toeslopes and sideslopes of the landscape. Also included are areas of Scituate, Newfields and Freetown soils in depressions, small seeps or wet pockets.

Chatfield soils typically have a very dark greyish-brown and dark brown loam surface layer 7 inches thick. The subsoil from 7 to 24 inches is brown, flaggy silt loam. Bedrock underlies the soil at 20 to 40 inches below the surface. Some areas have a substratum of pale yellow fine sandy loam. The bedrock is most commonly granite, gneiss, schist, phyllite, or conglomerate.

Soil Properties: Chatfield soils.

Permeability: moderate or moderately rapid.

Available water capacity: low to moderate.

Soil reaction: very strongly acid through medium acid throughout.

Depth to bedrock: 20 to 40 inches.

Seasonal high water table: Depth: greater than six feet.

Type & Months: N/A

Hydrologic group: B.

Hydric Soil: No

Capability Subclass: VIe

Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.

Duration & Months: none.

Canton soils typically have a surface layer is black fine sandy loam about 1 inch thick. The subsurface layer is dark gray fine sandy loam about 1 inch thick. The subsoil is about 20 inches thick. It is yellowish brown fine sandy loam in the upper part and light yellowish brown fine sandy loam in the lower part. The substratum is gravelly loamy sand to a depth of 60 inches or more. It is light olive gray in the upper part and olive gray in the lower part. Some areas have more gravel in the subsoil, and some areas have less gravel in the substratum.

Soil properties: Canton soils

Permeability: moderately rapid in the surface layer and subsoil, moderately rapid to moderately slow in the substratum.

Available water capacity: low.

Soil reaction: very strongly acid to moderately acid throughout.

Depth to bedrock: greater than 60 inches.

Seasonal high water table: Depth: greater than six feet.

Type & Months: N/A

Hydrologic group: B.

Hydric Soil: No.

Capability Subclass: VIs.

Flooding.Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.

Duration & Months: none.

Most of this complex is in woodland.

Crops:

This map unit is unsuited to most agricultural activities due to slope, shallow soils and large stones and boulders.

Woodland:

This soil is poorly suited for woodland productivity because of shallow depth to bedrock, steep slopes and low available water capacity. Therefore, optimum growth and survival are not expected, however, on-site investigations may reveal that tree plantings are practical with special treatment. Steep slopes and bedrock outcroppings restrict equipment operations.

Development:

This map unit occurs on bedrock controlled landforms with various types of underlying bedrock geology. Fractures and large faults in the bedrock provide the potential to transmit water rapidly to the aquifer without the benefits of treatment by the soil. Many areas of this unit are mapped in residential areas serviced by individual wells. Careful planning in these areas should be taken to protect the groundwater resources.

Slope and shallow depth to bedrock are the main limitations for building sites and extensive land shaping and blasting of bedrock are generally necessary. The underlying bedrock may hinder road construction in some areas, but when possible, constructing roads on the contour and planting roadbanks to well adapted grasses will help to reduce the erosion hazard. The underlying bedrock and steepness of slope give this complex very low potential for septic systems and in most areas, make it impractical to construct septic tank absorption fields. The topography and depth to the underlying bedrock is very irregular and may vary from the surface to greater than six feet within short distances.


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