PLYMOUTH COUNTY, MASSACHUSETTS SOIL SURVEY UPDATE

Urban-land Map Unit Complexes

602 Urban land.

This map unit consists of areas where 85 percent or more of the land is covered with impervious surfaces, such as buildings, pavement, industrial parks, and railroad yards. These areas are mapped throughout the survey area, large areas are mapped in the city of Brockton and downtown areas of many of the towns throughout the County. They are in almost every landscape position. This map unit ranges in size from approximately 2 to over 300 acres.

Most of this map unit is covered with impervious surfaces; consequently, nearly all rainfall runs off. A storm drainage system is needed to control this excessive runoff.

Included with this unit in mapping are areas of Udorthents, loamy, and Udorthents, wet substratum. These inclusions commonly vary with the underlying soil material of the adjoining Urban land. Some units have areas of rock outcrops and some are underlain by thick organic deposits. Included areas make up about 15 percent of the map unit.

It was impractical to identify in all areas the underlying soil because of the extent of impervious surfaces. Information on subsurface (surficial) geology is provided by the US Geologic Survey (USGS). This information on subsurface geology is important to determine limitations and interpretations on uses of this map unit. Onsite investigation is needed to determine the suitability for specific land uses.

This map unit has not been assigned to a capability subclass.

603 Urban land, wet substratum.

This map unit consists of Urban land developed in areas that were moderately to very poorly drained soils. Buildings, industrial areas, pavement, and railroad beds cover more than 85 percent of the land surface. This unit is mapped throughout the County primarily in low lying urban areas adjacent to wetlands, tidal marshes, and river valleys.

Included with this map unit are small areas of Udorthents and Udipsamments, wet substratum, and Udorthents, loamy, where the surface has been exposed. Also included are small areas of undisturbed wet soils and open water bodies. Included areas make up about 15 percent of the map unit.

Most of this map unit is covered with impervious surfaces; consequently, almost all rainfall runs off. Open drainage ditches are common in this unit, the ditches drain to nearby rivers, harbors, and swamps. A storm drainage system is needed to control this excessive runoff. The seasonal high water table is in the lower part of the substratum. Flooding and ponding may occur during heavy rain events.

Most of these areas are in commercial and industrial uses. If they are used as building sites, extensive onsite investigation is needed and pilings are typically used in preparing foundations. In a few areas of these soils vegetable gardens can be planted. Soil tests of individual areas are needed for depth, reaction, nutrients, and metal content.

This map unit has not been assigned to a capability subclass.

621 - Scio - Urban land complex

This complex consists of very deep, nearly level to gently sloping, moderately well drained Scio soils and areas of Urban land on glacial lake plains at low elevations. The soils and Urban land in this complex are so intermingled that it was not practical to map them separately. This complex is about 45 percent Scio soils, 40 percent Urban land and 15 percent other soils.

A few areas have more sand in the surface layer and subsoil. In the Urban land portion of this complex the original soil has been covered by impervious surfaces such as asphalt, concrete and buildings. In most places the underlying soil has been cut away or covered by fill from surrounding areas.

Included with this soil in mapping are areas of Haven soils on subtle rises in the topography. Eldridge, Sudbury and Deerfield soils in similar landscape positions. Isolated stones and boulder may also be found in the map unit. Raynham, and Enosburg soils are on lower elevation. Also included are areas of disturbed Udorthens soils.

Scio Soil properties:
Permeability: slow to moderate.
Available water capacity: moderate to high.
Soil reaction: very strongly acid to moderately acid above 40 inches and strongly acid to mildly alkaline below 40 inches.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: 1.5 to 3.0 below the surface.
Type & Months: perched, Dec. to May.
Hydrologic group: C.
Hydric soil: no.
Capability subclass: IIe
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Where this complex is mapped, land is committed to residential or commercial use. The major limitations to building site development include seasonal high water table and slow permeability in the substratum. Footing drains around foundations and use of sump pumps will help to remove excess subsurface water. Landscaping designed to drain surface water away from buildings will provide added assurance against damage caused by soil wetness. Constructing roads on well compacted, coarse textured base material will help protect them from frost damage. The seasonal high water table and slow permeability in the substratum of the Scio soil cause this soil to be poorly suited to septic tank absorption fields. Placing the leaching facility in a mound of more suitable fill material will help to overcome these limitations.

The Scio soils are fairly suited to establishment and maintenance of lawns, landscaping and gardens. Wetness caused by a seasonal high water table is the main limitation. Planting and tillage may be delayed by the seasonal wetness. Scio soil holds enough water to enable plants to tolerate short periods of drought.

622 - Paxton - Urban land complex

This undulating and rolling complex consists of very deep, well drained Paxton and similar soils and areas of Urban land on convex slopes of glaciated hills. These areas are 45 percent Paxton soils, 40 percent Urban land and 15 percent other soils. The Paxton soils and Urban land occur in such intricate patterns that it is not practical to separate them at the scale of mapping.

In the Urban land portion of this complex the original soil has been covered with impervious surfaces such as asphalt, concrete and buildings. In many places the underlying soil has been cut and removed or covered by fill from adjacent areas.

Included within this complex on similar landscape positions are small areas of Montauk and Canton soils. Woodbridge soils in occur in drainageways and on benches in the slope.

Paxton Soil properties:
Permeability: moderate in the solum, slow or very slow in the substratum.
Available water capacity: moderate
Soil reaction: very strongly acid to moderately acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: 2.5 to 4.0 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: perched, Feb. to Apr.
Hydrologic group: C
Hydric soil: no
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Where this complex is mapped, land is committed to residential and commercial use. Slope, excess soil wetness and frost action are the main limitations for road construction. This soil has very low potential for septic tank absorption fields. The restricted permeability in the substratum of this soil prevents it from readily absorbing sewage effluent.

The Paxton soil is well suited to lawns, landscaping, vegetable gardens and the growth of hardwood trees. When vegetative cover is removed on slopes the soil is susceptible to erosion.

623 - Woodbridge - Urban land complex

This gently to strongly sloping complex consists of very deep, well drained Woodbridge and similar soils with areas of Urban land on smooth top slopes, side slopes and toe slopes of glaciated hills. These areas are 45 percent Woodbridge soils, 40 percent Urban land and 15 percent other soils. The Woodbridge soils and Urban land occur in such intricate patterns that it is not practical to separate them at the scale of mapping.

In the Urban land portion of this complex the original soil has been covered with impervious surfaces such as asphalt, concrete and buildings. In many places the underlying soil has been cut and removed or covered by fill from adjacent areas.

Included with this complex in mapping are small areas of Paxton soils on slight rises in the landscape, Ridgebury soils in drainageways and Scituate soils on similar landscape positions. Included areas comprise about 15 percent of the map unit.

Woodbridge Soil properties:
Permeability: moderate in the solum, very slow in the substratum.
Available water capacity: moderate.
Soil reaction: very strongly acid to moderately acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: depth: 1.5 to 3.0 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: perched, Nov. to May.
Hydrologic group: C.
Hydric soil: no.
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Where this complex is mapped, land is committed to residential and commercial use. Slope and soil wetness are the main limitations for building site development. Slope, excess soil water and frost action are the main limitations for road construction. Due to the seasonal high water table and restricted permeability in the substratum the Woodbridge soil has very low potential for septic tank absorption fields. Placing distribution lines in a mound of more suitable fill material will help to overcome these limitations.

The Woodbridge soil is suited to lawns, landscaping, vegetable gardens and growth of hardwood trees. The seasonal high water table may restrict the selection of plant species and may limit operation of heavy equipment.

626 - Merrimac-Urban land complex

This nearly level and undulating complex consists of very deep, somewhat excessively drained Merrimac and similar soils (glacial fluvial deposits) and areas of urban land on broad plains. These areas are approximately 44 percent Merrimac soils, 40 percent Urban land and 15 percent other soils. The Merrimac soils and Urban land occur in such intricate patterns that it is not practical to map them separately at the scale of mapping.

In the Urban land portion of this complex, the original soil has been covered with impervious surfaces such as asphalt, concrete and buildings. In many areas the underlying soil has been cut and removed or covered by fill from adjacent areas.

Included with this soil in mapping are areas of Sudbury soils in depressions, Hinckley soils on isolated mounds and Windsor soils in similar landscape positions. Also included are areas of Udorthents.

Soil properties:
Permeability: moderately rapid in the surface layer and subsoil, moderately rapid to rapid in the substratum.
Available water capacity: low to moderate.
Soil reaction: extremely acid to moderately acid.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: more than 6 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: N/A
Hydrologic group: A
Hydric Soil: no
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Most areas are used for residential or industrial development.

Where this complex is mapped, land is committed to residential and commercial use. The Merrimac soil has no major limitations for building site development or local road construction. It has very high potential for septic tank absorption fields. It readily absorbs but may not adequately filter sewage effluent which may result in the pollution of groundwater supplies. Low density housing reduces the volume of effluent entering the groundwater system and will lessen the severity of the pollution hazard. Additional precautionary measures may be necessary in some areas. These areas are associated with aquifer recharge, caution should be used to protect the underlying aquifer.

The Merrimac soil is suited to lawns, landscaping, vegetable gardens and growth of hardwood trees. The sandy nature of the substratum material has a sever hazard of sidewall collapse and sloughing during excavation.

627 - Newport - Urban land

This map unit consist of very deep, gently sloping to moderately steep, well drained soils formed in glacial till, and areas of Urban land on hills in the northen part of Plymouth county. This map unit typically consist of about 45 percent Newport soils, 40 percent Urban land, and 15 percent soils of minor extent. The Newport soils and areas of Urban land are in such an intricate pattern that it was not practical to separate them at the scale used for mapping.

Urban land consists of areas where the original soils has been covered with impervious surfaces, such as asphalt, concrete, and buildings. In most cases the underlying soil has been cut, removed and covered with fill.

Included in this map unit are areas of Pittstown soils in low flat areas, Paxton soils on similar landscapes, and areas of Udorthents loamy, and Udorthents-wet substratum in areas where the original soils has been cut and filled. Also included are soils that have bedrock within 60 inches.

Newport Soil properties:
Permeability: moderate to moderately rapid in the solum and slow or very slow in the substratum.
Available water capacity: moderate.
Soil reaction: very strongly acid to moderately acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: 2.5 to 4.0 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: perched, Feb. to Apr.
Hydrologic group: C.
Hydric Soil: No.
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

The mapped areas of this complex are in residential and commercial uses.

Where this complex is mapped, land is committed to residential and commercial use. This map unit is poorly suited for sites with on site sewage disposal systems due to slow permeability of the substratum and perched seasonal high watertable. Installing drain fields with trenches that are larger than the average size helps to overcome this limitation. Tile drains around building foundations help to lower the seasonal high watertable. Designing lots to drain surface water away fron buildings helps to prevent damage to the structural interior. Newport soils contain a high ammount of fines and are considered highly erodible. During construction, minimizing the exposed soils area helps to control erosion. Hay bale barriers, geotextile fabric and hydroseeding help to control erosion. Large stones and boulders in the soil may hinder excavation activities.

628- Canton - Urban land complex

This gently sloping to moderately steep complex consists of very deep, well drained Canton and similar soils (ice-contact deposits) and areas of urban land on upland plains, moraines and terraces. These areas are 45 percent Canton soils, 40 percent Urban land and 15 percent other soils. The Canton soils and Urban land areas occur in such intricate patterns that it is not practical to map them separately.

In the Urban land portion of this complex, the original soil has been covered with impervious surfaces such as asphalt, concrete and buildings. In many areas the underlying soil has been cut and removed or covered by fill from adjacent areas.

Included with this soil in mapping are areas of disturbed (Udorthents) soils, Newfields soils in depressions, Gloucester soils on isolated mounds, and Barnstable soils in similar landscape positions.

Soil properties: Canton soils
Permeability: moderately rapid in the surface layer and subsoil, rapid in the substratum.
Available water capacity: low to moderate.
Soil reaction: very strongly acid to moderately acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: greater than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: greater than six feet.
Type & Months: N/A
Hydrologic group: B
Hydric Soil: No
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Where this complex is mapped, land is committed to residential and commercial use. The Canton soil has no major limitations for building site development or local road construction. It has very high potential for septic tank absorption fields. It readily absorbs but may not adequately filter sewage effluent which may result in the pollution of groundwater supplies. Low density housing reduces the volume of effluent entering the groundwater system and will lessen the severity of the pollution hazard. Additional precautionary measures may be necessary in some areas. Subsurface stones and boulders are usually associated with this glacial till soil and may hinder excavation operations. The soil properties and characteristics of Urban land are variable and on-site investigations are needed to determine the limitations and suitability's of these areas for specific uses.

634 - Birchwood-Urban land complex

This gently sloping to moderately sloping complex consists of very deep, moderately well drained Birchwood and similar soils and areas of Urban land on smooth top slopes, side slopes and toe slopes of glaciated hills. These areas are 45 percent Birchwood soils, 40 percent Urban land and 15 percent other soils. The Birchwood soils and Urban land occur in such intricate patterns that it is not practical to separate them at the scale of mapping.

In the Urban land portion of this complex the original soil has been covered with impervious surfaces such as asphalt, concrete and buildings. In many places the underlying soil has been cut and removed or covered by fill from adjacent areas.

Included with this complex in mapping are small areas of Poquonock soils on slight rises in the landscape, Mattapoisett soils in drainageways and Scituate soils on similar landscape positions. Deerfield soils are on nearby outwash deposits. In some areas the depth to the firm glacial till deposit is greater than 72 inches. Also included are Udorthent and Udipsamment soils which are in disturbed areas. Included areas comprise about 15 percent of the map unit.

Soil properties:
Permeability: moderately rapid to rapid in the surface layer, rapid or very rapid in the subsoil, slow to very slow in the substratum.
Available water capacity: low.
Soil reaction: very strongly acid to slightly acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: 1.5 to 3.0 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: Perched, Nov. to Apr.
Hydrologic group: C.
Hydric Soil: No
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Where this complex is mapped, land is committed to residential and commercial use. Slope and soil wetness are the main limitations for building site development. Slope, excess soil water and frost action are the main limitations for road construction. Due to the seasonal high water table and restricted permeability in the substratum, the Birchwood soil has a low potential for septic tank absorption fields. Placing distribution lines in a mound of more suitable fill material will help to overcome these limitations.

The Birchwood soil is suited to lawns, landscaping, vegetable gardens and growth of hardwood trees. The seasonal high water table may restrict the selection of plant species and may limit operation of heavy equipment.

635 - Canton-Urbanland-Rock outcrop complex

636 - Montauk-Urban Land Complex

This undulating and rolling complex consists of very deep, well drained Montauk and similar soils and areas of Urban land on convex slopes of glaciated hills. These areas are 45 percent Montauk soils, 40 percent Urban land and 15 percent other soils. The Montauk soils and Urban land occur in such intricate patterns that it is not practical to separate them at the scale of mapping.

In the Urban land portion of this complex the original soil has been covered with impervious surfaces such as asphalt, concrete and buildings. In many places the underlying soil has been cut and removed or covered by fill from adjacent areas.

Included with this complex in mapping are areas of Paxton and Canton soils on similar landscape positions and Scituate and Woodbridge soils in drainageways and benches in the slope.

Soil properties:
Permeability: moderate to moderately rapid in the solum, slow to moderately slow in the substratum.
Available water capacity: moderate to low.
Soil reaction: extremely acid to moderately acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: 2.5 to 4.0 feet below the surface.
Type & Months: perched, Feb. to May.
Hydrologic group: C.
Hydric soil: no.
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Where this complex is mapped, land is committed to residential and commercial use. Slope, excess soil wetness and frost action are the main limitations for road construction. This soil has very low potential for septic tank absorption fields. The restricted permeability in the substratum of this soil prevents it from readily absorbing sewage effluent.

The Montauk soil is well suited to lawns, landscaping, vegetable gardens and the growth of hardwood trees. When vegetative cover is removed on slopes, the soil is susceptible to erosion.

637- Carver-Urban Land complex

This nearly level to undulating complex consists of very deep, excessively drained Carver and similar soils (glaciofluvial deposits) and areas of urban land on outwash plains and deltas. These areas are 45 percent Carver soils, 40 percent Urban land and 15 percent other soils. The Carver soils and Urban land occur in such intricate patterns that it is not practical to map them separately at the scale of mapping.

In the Urban land portion of this complex, the original soil has been covered with impervious surfaces such as asphalt, concrete and buildings. In many areas the underlying soil has been cut and removed or covered by fill from adjacent areas.

Included with this soil in mapping are areas of Plymouth and Windsor soils on similar landforms. Deerfield soils are in low lying areas and depressions. Also included are human altered areas consisting of fill and excavated soils typically associated with Udisamments and Udorthent map units.

Carver Soil properties:
Permeability: very rapid throughout.
Available water capacity: low.
Soil reaction: extremely acid to moderately acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: more than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: greater than six feet.
Type & Months: N/A
Hydrologic group: A.
Hydric Soil: No
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: none.
Duration & Months: none.

Most areas are used for residential or industrial development.

Where this complex is mapped, land is committed to residential and commercial use. The Carver soil has no major limitations for building site development or local road construction. It has very high potential for septic tank absorption fields. It readily absorbs but may not adequately filter sewage effluent which may result in the pollution of groundwater supplies. Low density housing reduces the volume of effluent entering the groundwater system and will lessen the severity of the pollution hazard. Additional precautionary measures may be necessary in some areas. The sandy nature of the substratum material has a sever hazard of sidewall collapse and sloughing during excavation.

The Carver soil is poorly suited to lawns, landscaping and vegetable gardens due to the extreme droughtyness of the soil. Adding a layer of finer textured topsoil and irrigating is helpful in overcomming this limitation.

The soil properties and characteristics of areas of Urban land are variable and on-site investigations are needed to determine the limitations and suitabilities of these areas for specific uses.

639 - Hooksan Urbanland complex

640 Urban land, till substratum.

641 Urban land, outwash substratum

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