PLYMOUTH COUNTY, MASSACHUSETTS SOIL SURVEY UPDATE

Whitman Soils - Very deep, very poorly drained soils formed in loamy dense till. Whitman soils are on depressions and along drainageways of upland till landforms. Slopes range from 0 to 8 percent.

Link to Official Series Description
Map Unit (s): 72A, 73A
Map Phases:

    72A Whitman mucky fine sandy loam, 0 to 3 percent slopes
    73A - Whitman mucky fine sandy loam, extremely stony, 0 to 3 percent slopes.

Taxonomic Classification: Coarse loamy, mixed, active, nonacid, mesic, Typic Humaquepts.
Drainage Class: Very poorly drained.
Parent Material: Dense till.
Permeability: Moderate or moderately rapid in the surface layer and the subsoil and slow or very slow in the substratum..
Available Water Holding Capacity: Moderate.
Soil Reaction: Strongly acid or moderately acid throughout..
Depth to Bedrock: Greater than 65 inches.
Seasonal High Watertable: Depth: +1.0 to 0.5 feet below the surface.
Type: Perched.
Months: September to June.
Hydrologic Group: D.
Hydric Soil: Yes.
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency and Type: Frequently ponded.
Duration and Months: Long, December to March.
Potential Inclusions: Brockton soils are a similar inclusion. Poorly drained Ridgebury, Norwell, and Mattapoisett soils are on higher elevations. Moderately well drained Scituate and Birchwood soils are on upland landscapes.

 

72A Whitman mucky fine sandy loam, 0 to 3 percent slopes

This is a very deep, nearly level and gently sloping, very poorly drained soil along drainageways, in depressions, and in low areas on uplands. Slopes range from 0 to 5 percent.

Typically, the surface layer is black fine sandy loam about 9 inches thick. The subsoil is mottled, grayish brown gravelly fine sandy loam about 13 inches thick. The substratum extends to a depth of 60 inches or more. It is firm, grayish brown gravelly sandy loam.

Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of Brockton and Swansea soils on similar landscape positions. Ridgebury and Norwell soils are on sightly higher elevations and Woodbridge and Scituate soils are on upland convex slopes. Also included are areas that have slopes of 5 to 8 percent and areas where stones cover more than 1 percent of the surface.

Properties:
Permeability Moderate or moderately rapid in the surface layer and the subsoil and slow or very slow in the substratum.
Available water capacity: Moderate.
Soil reaction: Strongly acid or moderately acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: Greater than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: +1 to 1 foot below the surface.
Type & Months: perched, Sep. to Jun.
Hydrologic group: D.
Hydric Soil: Yes.
Capability Subclass: VIIs.
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: Frequent, ponding.
Duration & Months: Very long, Nov. to Jun.

Most areas of this soil are woodland.

Crops:

This soil is very poorly suited to cultivated crops and pasture because of ponding, and seasonal high water tables.

Woodland:

This soil is poorly suited for woodland management due to ponding, and windthrow hazard. Thinning crowded stands to accepted standard stocking levels allows for more vigorous growth. Trees commonly found in this soil are red maple, eastern white pine, and white oak.

Development:

Whitman soils are hydric soils associated with wetlands. Wetlands are protected from disturbance by State and Federal regulations. Development activities within these areas typically require special permits prior to disturbance. Whitman soils are not suitable for development because of ponding, seasonal high water table, large subsurface stones and boulders, and slow permeability. This soil is not suitable for onsite septic systems.

Wildlife habitat:

This soil is suited to wetland wildlife. The native plant communities common to this soil provide adequate food and cover for wildlife communities.

73A - Whitman mucky fine sandy loam, extremely stony, 0 to 3 percent slopes.

This is a very deep, nearly level and gently sloping, very poorly drained soil along drainageways, in depressions, and in low areas on uplands. Slopes range from 0 to 5 percent. Surface stones and boulders cover 3 to 15 percent of the surface.

Typically, the surface layer is black fine sandy loam about 9 inches thick. The subsoil is mottled, grayish brown gravelly fine sandy loam about 13 inches thick. The substratum extends to a depth of 60 inches or more. It is firm, grayish brown gravelly sandy loam.

Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of Brockton and Swansea soils on similar landscape positions. Ridgebury and Norwell soils are on sightly higher elevations and Woodbridge and Scituate soils are on upland convex slopes. Also included are areas that have slopes of 5 to 8 percent and areas where stones cover less than 3 percent of the surface.

Properties:
Permeability Moderate or moderately rapid in the surface layer and the subsoil and slow or very slow in the substratum.
Available water capacity: Moderate.
Soil reaction: Strongly acid or moderately acid throughout.
Depth to bedrock: Greater than 60 inches.
Seasonal high water table: Depth: +1 to 1 foot below the surface.
Type & Months: perched, Sep. to Jun.
Hydrologic group: D.
Hydric Soil: Yes.
Capability Subclass: VIIs.
Flooding/Ponding Potential: Frequency & Type: Frequent, ponding.
Duration & Months: Very long, Nov. to Jun.

Most areas of this soil are woodland.

Crops:

This soil is very poorly suited to cultivated crops and pasture because of ponding, seasonal high water tables, and larger surface stones and boulders.

Woodland:

This soil is poorly suited for woodland management due to ponding, windthrow hazard, and large stones and boulders. Thinning crowded stands to accepted standard stocking levels allows for more vigorous growth. Trees commonly found in this soil are red maple, eastern white pine, and white oak.

Development:

Whitman soils are hydric soils associated with wetlands. Wetlands are protected from disturbance by State and Federal regulations. Development activities within these areas typically require special permits prior to disturbance. Whitman soils are not suitable for development because of ponding, seasonal high water table, large surface and subsurface stones and boulders, and slow permeability. This soil is not suitable for onsite septic systems.

Wildlife habitat:

This soil is suited to wetland wildlife. The native plant communities common to this soil provide adequate food and cover for wildlife communities.

 

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